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I have tried to look it up, and find answers, it really intrigues me!

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  • $\begingroup$ One mole of nitrogen does not have the same mass as one mole of oxygen... $\endgroup$ – Jon Custer Feb 6 '19 at 15:52
  • $\begingroup$ The question doesn't make much sense. It's like asking "Does 1 metre have the same colour?" $\endgroup$ – Faded Giant Feb 6 '19 at 16:17
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A mole of any substance is defined as Avogadro's number of molecules of that substance. So every mole has the same number of molecules. Since the masses of molecules differ, the mass of a mole of any substance will be dependent on the mass of one molecule of that substance. That is,

(Mass of one mole) = (Avogadro's number) x (the mass of one molecule).

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