0
$\begingroup$

Hydrogen bonds are said to be one of the strongest molecular interactions in nature. Then why can most substances that interact through hydrogen bondig such as water and $\ce{NH3}$ able to dissolve a large variety of both ionic and covalent laboratory reagents? Does it have something to do with the structure of $\ce{NH3}$ or something else?

$\endgroup$

closed as unclear what you're asking by Mithoron, Tyberius, A.K., andselisk, airhuff Jan 19 at 21:32

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 3
    $\begingroup$ Hydrogen bonds are the weakest interactions that still make directed bonds. Water is not "hydrogen-bonded", it makes hydrogen bonds to itself and to other substances, in 99% of the cases these are exactly those substances that mix well with or are soluble in water. $\endgroup$ – Karl Jan 18 at 16:46
  • $\begingroup$ Who says they're "excellent"? Most compounds aren't particularly soluble in them or react. $\endgroup$ – Mithoron Jan 18 at 21:02
  • $\begingroup$ @Mithoron Thank you for the point. On research, found that most existing compounds (by numbers) aren't soluble in solvents that interact through hydrogen-bonding. Edited the question to "laboratory reagents" from "compounds". $\endgroup$ – Kartik Jan 20 at 4:24
2
$\begingroup$

Recall that hydrogen bonding interactions result from the polarized nature of bonds between hydrogen and nitrogen, oxygen, and fluorine. This polarized bond results in a hydrogen atom with very low electron density—a property that allows the atom to interact very strongly with negatively charged particles.

enter image description here

Thus, anions and electronegative atoms in polarized molecules have very strong electrostatic interactions with the low-electron-density hydrogen atom in $\ce{NH3}$ or $\ce{H2O}$, for example. Cations and positively charged elements in polarized molecules can also be stabilized by the electronegative atoms in molecules exhibiting hydrogen bonding ($\ce{N}$ and $\ce{O}$ in this case).

enter image description here

These strong interparticular interactions ultimately result in polarized or ionic solutes generally being very soluble in solvents with hydrogen bonding such as $\ce{NH3}$ or $\ce{H2O}$.

$\endgroup$

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.