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What sort of analogy is good to use for remembering how the length of hydrocarbon chains affect the properties such as melting point and volatility?

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closed as primarily opinion-based by Mithoron, Jon Custer, andselisk, Mathew Mahindaratne, Todd Minehardt Jan 12 at 19:16

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ Small birds fly, big birds don't. $\endgroup$ – aventurin Jan 12 at 8:59
  • $\begingroup$ Why is this being downvoted? I'm trying to share helpful knowledge!!! $\endgroup$ – 615283 Jan 12 at 8:59
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Imagine two bins of cables, one has 20 1m cables the other has 20 10m cables. Imagine each cable as a chain. The 10m cables will be harder to untangle and therefore harder for the molecules to break away from each other, giving the longer cables/hydrocarbons a higher melting point and viscosity. Because of this, the volatility is lowered in longer chains.

This will help you remember the properties.

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615283 is a new contributor to this site. Take care in asking for clarification, commenting, and answering. Check out our Code of Conduct.
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  • $\begingroup$ Probably down voted as you jumped from viscosity and melting point to volatility too abruptly. You can also mention that longer cable have more mass so that they move slowly if handled by the same man . There is a minimum speed to break intermolecular force $\endgroup$ – Alchimista Jan 12 at 10:38

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