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Could the density of an aqueous solution be less than 1g/ml ? For an example, can 0.98g/ml be taken as a density for an aqueous sulphuric acid solution ?

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  • $\begingroup$ Yes. With the exception of negative quantities or ones where the reaction quotient exceeds the solubility product, anything is fair game. $\endgroup$ – Todd Minehardt Dec 3 '18 at 19:14
  • $\begingroup$ Sol. of H2SO4 tend to be denser then water. $\endgroup$ – Mithoron Dec 4 '18 at 19:32
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Answer to your question, "could the density of an aqueous solution be less than $\pu{1g/mL}$," is yes. See following examples:

The density of the commercially available 28% ammonia solution ($\ce{NH3}$ 1n $\ce{H2O}$) is listed as $\pu{0.9 g/mL}$ at 25 °C (Sigma-Aldrich Catalog).

MERCK Tabellen für das Labor has listed the density of 35% ammonia solution ($\pu{18 mol/L}$ concentration) as $\pu{0.88 g/mL}$ at 20 °C (Steffen's Chemistry Pages)

As obvious, the densities of various aqueous ethanol solutions are also equal to less than unity since the density of absolute ethanol is $\pu{0.789 g/mL}$ at 20 °C (Wikipedia). By a quick google search, I found the densities of various aqueous ethanol solutions listed in MERCK Tabellen für das Labor in Steffen's Chemistry Pages, which is pretty interesting.

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