2
$\begingroup$

Similarly to a question asked here, would mixing two solutions containing metallic ions in different proportions allow to electroplate something with the alloy of the metals? For example if I take a $\ce{CuSO4}$ solution and mix it with a $\ce{ZnSO4}$ solution, will I be able to electroplate brass? If I want to make 70/30 brass, would mixing a 0.7 mol/L and 0.3 mol/L solution work?

I know a "brass" solution can be made by reverse electroplating (is that the term?) a brass anode in an acid solution so mixing two solutions should have the same result, copper and zinc ions in a solution.

$\endgroup$
3
$\begingroup$

In short, yes, it is possible to electroplate alloys, but it isn't as simple as just mixing the ions you want in the ratio you want. In the simplest approximation, the alloy deposition would behave as two simultaneous, separate depositions at the same voltage and the composition could be controlled by changing the voltage, assuming each component has a different current-voltage response. In the real world, unfortunately, there are numerous interactions between the ions in solution, the metals on the electrode, etc. and the outcome becomes quite complex to predict. Here is a decent open-access review of the chemistry and applications of this type of process.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.