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I would like to know how I can clean a silk tie at the knot. I presume it got filthy, over time, due to "fatty" fingers. I am looking for answers either based on 1) good theory or 2) personal experience. I am not looking for grandma's advice.

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  • $\begingroup$ I think this is fine for the site, it's an application question about materials and reagents. You will probably get a better answer eventually. $\endgroup$ – jonsca May 1 '14 at 23:25
  • $\begingroup$ I'm confused, what do you mean by "at the knot"? $\endgroup$ – qwersjc May 2 '14 at 3:16
  • $\begingroup$ @qwersjc That's the location of the staining. The staining probably happens when I pull up the knot to my neck (over months or even years). Maybe it is sweat. $\endgroup$ – Keep these mind May 2 '14 at 4:02
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Dry clean a soiled tie at a commercial establishment. Bombyx mori pupae died for our ties. While you are here, learn to tie the knot. Practice with a cheap polyester expendable resource.

http://arxiv.org/abs/1401.8242
177,147 ways to knot a tie.

A Trinity knot has no small end, removing the need for a tie tack. It is a full Windsor tied with the narrow end, plus two steps. Set the broad end where you want it, for it stays there during tying. The very first thing you must do is pinch the neck location into a dimple where the first bight wraps. The diagram is otherwise complete. The Matrix Reloaded Merovingian or Ediety Knot ("a tie wearing a tie") is a full Windsor that begins with the seam side showing. Tie it, loosen, pull over your head. Reverse it seam side down, put it back on. It must be worn with a vest. You may now be seen in public.

Trinity tie knot Tying a Trinity knot

For Referees - When you wear a suit, wear a tie knot that makes you better than the opposition.

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    $\begingroup$ Cool knot! I may try it out sometime - however I think the OP knows that a dry-cleaners will fix his problem, and was looking for an alternative. $\endgroup$ – qwersjc May 2 '14 at 3:18
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks. I once brought a few ties to such an establishment. I don't know what they did, but they were able to return them with the stains still there and the ties differently shaped. The dry cleaning apparently undid the folding, so they must have repressed them in a shape that looked OK to them. Some of the folding is internal to the tie, and since the ties now had bumps internally, I guess they didn't quite get those right either. I threw the ties away. $\endgroup$ – Keep these mind May 2 '14 at 4:10
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I am not sure if this falls into the grandma advice category, but when visiting silk shops in China, one of the guys claimed that the silk threads was similar to human hair, and one way to test if something was real silk was to try to set fire to a tiny part of it, it should smell like burnt hair. And that using a hair shampoo was good for washing silk.

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    $\begingroup$ Can you substantiate this a bit with some chemistry? $\endgroup$ – jonsca May 3 '14 at 23:29
  • $\begingroup$ This does make sense, because silk is similar to hair in some ways, but if I were to try this I would probably use something gentle like baby shampoo. $\endgroup$ – qwersjc May 4 '14 at 5:24

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