-2
$\begingroup$

I'm doing a lab for a class , and in the manual, they right the compound as Fe(Cl)$_2$. I looked up that compound, and it has a very high boiling point, but the compound during the lab was already in a liquid state, so I'm pretty confused. Specifically what was created was made from dissolving iron in HCl in a boiling water bath. I don't know much about chemistry, so if you can try to dumb it down, that would be much appreciated!

$\endgroup$

closed as unclear what you're asking by MaxW, Mithoron, A.K., user55119, Nilay Ghosh Nov 6 '18 at 4:24

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • $\begingroup$ Why does a high boiling point disagree with it being a liquid or dissolved in solution? If the boiling point is high, that means it will likely be a liquid if the temperature is lower than that (or a solid if the temperature is even lower). @user69873 $\endgroup$ – Tyberius Nov 5 '18 at 21:03
3
$\begingroup$

It should be labeled "FeCl2, water solution". You have a water solution. Like most metal chlorides, ferrous chloride dissolves readily into water.

Keep it in an airtight container. Ferrous ion in solution gets oxidized easily.

$\endgroup$

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.