0
$\begingroup$

In my school, there is a redox titration between H2C2O4 being titrand and KMnO4 being titrant. After adding H2SO4 to the acid to give an acidic medium for redox, the whole mixture inside the conical flask is heated up to 80 degree Celsius before titration starts, what is the need of heating?

$\endgroup$
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ Chemicals reactions tend to happen faster in a hotter solution. The rule of thumb, for which there are exceptions, is that for every 10 C increase in temperature that the reaction rate doubles. // Also CO2 is less soluble in hot solution which drives the reaction to completion faster too. $\endgroup$ – MaxW Nov 3 '18 at 15:33
0
$\begingroup$

In general, the higher the temperature the faster the reaction. This is because increasing the temperature increases the number of molecules with more kinetic energy, and hence more molecules would have energy greater than the activation energy. If the reaction between oxalic acid and potassium permanganate wasn't heated then it would take extremely long to see the self-indicating titration occurring.

$\endgroup$

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.