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If there is only 1 Oxyanion in a series, what is it’s prefix/suffix? Also, if I have Copper(I) Iodate, how do I know how many oxygen atoms are in the compound?

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Mithoron, A.K., Jon Custer, Tyberius, user55119 Nov 1 '18 at 1:10

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  • $\begingroup$ Also, does a specific amount of oxygen correspond to the prefix/suffix? Example: compound with 1 oxygen= Hypo-X-ite, 2 oxygens= X-ite, 3 oxygens= X-are, and 4 oxygens = Per-X-ate $\endgroup$ – Jon due Oct 31 '18 at 0:52
  • $\begingroup$ Like this matters, really. On one hand people want some complicated IUPAC names, on the other still use naming from what XIX century? $\endgroup$ – Mithoron Oct 31 '18 at 1:11
  • $\begingroup$ I agree, but this is also for homework XD $\endgroup$ – Jon due Oct 31 '18 at 1:12
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If there is only 1 oxyanion in a series, what is it’s prefix/suffix?

This anion gets the "-ate" suffix and no prefix. Example: Carbonate $\ce{CO3^2-}$. There is no "carbonite" to freeze Han Solo in; the $\ce{CO2^2-}$ anion does not exist. Carbon does form other oxyanions, like oxalate, $\ce{C2O4^2-}$, but these anions also vary in the number of carbon atoms.

Also, if I have Copper(I) Iodate, how do I know how many oxygen atoms are in the compound?

Iodine can form multiple oxyanions, although hypoiodite and iodite are not particularly stable:

  • $\ce{IO-}$ - hypoiodite
  • $\ce{IO2^-}$ - iodite
  • $\ce{IO3^-}$ - iodate
  • $\ce{IO4^-}$ - metaperiodate
  • $\ce{IO6^5-}$ - orthoperiodate

With the exception of the "meta" and "ortho" periodates, this same trend is seen for two other halogens, chlorine and bromine (chlorine shown):

  • $\ce{ClO-}$ - hypochlorite
  • $\ce{ClO2^-}$ - chlorite
  • $\ce{ClO3^-}$ - chlorate
  • $\ce{ClO4^-}$ - perchlorate
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  • $\begingroup$ Thank you, but let’s say I didn’t know Iodine could form multiple oxyanions, how would I know how many oxygen atoms are in Iodate? $\endgroup$ – Jon due Oct 31 '18 at 10:26
  • $\begingroup$ And vice versa. If I have BaIO4, how do I know it’s name if I don’t have the other oxyanions with iodine? $\endgroup$ – Jon due Oct 31 '18 at 11:27
  • $\begingroup$ @Jondue - You have two choices: Look it up or memorize it. $\endgroup$ – Ben Norris Oct 31 '18 at 11:52

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