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This question already has an answer here:

For the complex $\ce{[Fe(CN)5NO]^{2-}}$ wikipedia cites that the oxidation no. of Fe is +2 and that of NO is +1. CN being -1 the net charge thus becomes -2. However at certain places I read that NO is neutral and Fe is in its +3 oxidation state. In both cases the net charge is -2. However which of the two is correct ?

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marked as duplicate by Mithoron, Tyberius, A.K., Greg, Mathew Mahindaratne Nov 1 '18 at 4:03

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The thing about nitrogen monoxide ($\ce{NO}$) is that it can be both a neutral compound and an ionic compound, depending on the context. This problem is about complex ions, which consist of a metal cation and supporting 'ligands.' Ligands are entities/molecules which bind to a metal cation to form a complex or coordinate ion.

For more info: https://chem.libretexts.org/Textbook_Maps/General_Chemistry/Map%3A_General_Chemistry_(Petrucci_et_al.)/24%3A_Complex_Ions_and_Coordination_Compounds/24.03%3A_Nomenclature

According to this article, in $\ce{[Fe(CN)_5NO]^{-2}}$, $\ce{Fe}$ is the metal cation, and $\ce{CN^{-1}}$ and $\ce{NO}$ are the supporting ligands. Given that the ion CN has a charge of -1, that will be its oxidation number. NO is neutral, so it has no oxidation number. Putting this all together:
$\ce{Fe} + 5\cdot(-1) + 0 = -2\ \ \ \ $ - - - - - - -> $\ \ \ \ \ce{Fe} = +3$

Therefore, iron has a charge and an oxidation number of +3. ($\ce{Fe^{+3}}$)

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  • $\begingroup$ Check signs in your equation. $\endgroup$ – Oscar Lanzi Oct 30 '18 at 9:52

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