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This question already has an answer here:

This question just popped up in head. There are many things which we are good at. We are good at:

  • constructions.
  • build stuff.
  • destroying things.
  • repairing things.
  • cleaning.

But I want also to know, if it is possible to create for example: Beryllium, Gold, Iron, Silver and Platinum.

Question: Are we humans able to create natural metals? Or,it is impossible?

If it is possible for us to create any kind of metals, then, can you grant me informations of how or what substances I need to use for creating each metal? I have found in here that shows you can create gold, but what about other metals? Are we capable of doing so? If we create metals, then do they have the same value and resistance just like the metals which are found in mountains and underground?

Just in curiosity.

NOTE: I’ve used on list “destroying” because, that’s how I see. Because, I have seen on a video about pollution, that we humans almost brought our home world to an end due to our ignorance. And that’s from where I got this idea. We’re incapable of taking care of our world.

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marked as duplicate by Mithoron, A.K., Tyberius, Todd Minehardt, Jon Custer Oct 28 '18 at 16:38

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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The idea of creating metals is from alchemy, which was the ancient forerunner to chemistry. This belief started to become debunked after Robert Boyle published "The Sceptical Chymists" in the 1600's.

In 1785, Antoine Lavoisier, discovered the law of conservation of mass which states mass is not created or destroyed, it merely changes form. This law is one of the foundations of modern chemistry. Even in the video, it states the gold is not being created it is merely changing form. In the discipline of chemistry, it is considered not possible to create any metal.

Outside the discipline of chemistry in the discipline of physics it was discovered mass and energy are interchangeable. This has given rise to the idea of nuclear transmutation. Nuclear transmutation is certainly possible; however, it is an incredibly expensive feat which is often considered too impractical for consideration in the practice of practical chemistry.

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