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Figured I would try here rather than a food-oriented forum.

Is finely ground coffee (Espresso/Turkish) soluble in any consumable liquid?

Otherwise asked: is there any liquid available to the average consumer that will allow him/her to make instant coffee out of grounds?

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    $\begingroup$ No way to dissolve the grounds, and that would no doubt given the coffee a much different taste. // I have seen coffee marketed in tea bags. $\endgroup$ – MaxW Oct 2 '18 at 18:46
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    $\begingroup$ This may seem ridiculously obvious, but hot water will do it. But it won't dissolve everything, just the stuff that makes coffee. Even if you could dissolve the remaining material it would not be coffee as the insoluble parts won't taste like the soluble parts (which is after all what makes the drink). $\endgroup$ – matt_black Oct 2 '18 at 23:26
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    $\begingroup$ It's a fair comment. Yes, it's easy to simply add hot water to very fine coffee grounds and make coffee. But that requires boiling water and knowing when to stop drinking to avoid the grounds at the bottom. I was simply interested in knowing whether there was any liquid into which the whole coffee grinds would dissolve, at room temperature, for convenience. Re: taste. Chewing roasted coffee beans (or consuming the inside of chocolate-coated coffee beans) tastes roughly the same as drinking a cup of coffee to me. $\endgroup$ – Daniel R Oct 2 '18 at 23:44
  • $\begingroup$ Why don't you just buy instant coffee then? That's what they make it for. $\endgroup$ – Karl Oct 3 '18 at 8:08
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    $\begingroup$ uncomfortable with the amount of processing in instant coffee powder, but you would consider drinking some strange liquid chemical that dissolves coffee beans? ;-) $\endgroup$ – Karl Oct 3 '18 at 14:43
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The water-soluble material in coffee beans (1-2.5% caffeine) and water-extractable oils (10-15%) represent a small percentage of the total bean. There is a lot of carbohydrate (~50%), not all of which is soluble, and some volatile oils (not so tasty).

The bean is not totally soluble in anything, but when ground very fine, it could be dispersed in a thick suspension (or a thin suspension, if you keep shaking it up). I wonder what coffee material is used in coffee-flavored ice cream: ground beans, powdered instant? The ground-up bean would probably be a good source of dietary fiber.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks for the answer, James! Neither here nor there, but I believed that whether those coffee oils make it into the brew or not depends on the method used (and I believe that unfiltered coffee methods like pour-over and Turkish, including those oils, have been implicated in raised cholestrol levels). I presume that that is referring specifically to the water-soluble oils which you mention? So hot water over finely ground beans will provide a suspension, but there is truly no liquid into which the bean will be soluble? $\endgroup$ – Daniel R Oct 3 '18 at 20:17
  • $\begingroup$ My interest in this, by the way, is in finding a way of benefiting from the residual fibre, antixodants (probable), and whatever else doesn't make it into an aqueous solution while still enjoying the benefits of caffeine (namely, caffeination and the ingestion of xanthines). $\endgroup$ – Daniel R Oct 3 '18 at 20:22
  • $\begingroup$ It was informative to address your question, so I looked up coffee beans in Wikipedia. Otherwise I just drink it. I must not be very discriminating; I use cream and sugar to taste. The grounds could be a good source of fiber - just look at what you discard! $\endgroup$ – James Gaidis Oct 4 '18 at 13:52

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