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Need help with the IUPAC name for the following line structure.

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closed as off-topic by Tyberius, Karl, Avnish Kabaj, a-cyclohexane-molecule, Mithoron Aug 17 '18 at 14:23

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In the image, each of the numbers with black ink represents the carbon atom of the main chain. How I got this chain? Simple, You just count until you have found the best possible scenario with the longest chain. In this case, it's the carbon chain with 6 atoms. Now in this chain, you can see that there are 3 branches. Each connecting to a carbon atom. Since it's a single bond, It's connected to a Methyl (CH3). If it had been a double bond then it would have been Ethyl (C2H5). Now, look at the position of the braches. Two branches are at 3, and one branch is at 4. so we get 3,3,4. The two 3's represent the two branches and the one 4 represents the single branch at position 4. Since, we have 3 Methyl we will use TriMethyl. Where Tri represents the number of methyl branching out of the main chain. The numbers give out the location and Tri tells us about how many there are. If There had been two methyls then we would have used DiMethyl. So far we have, 3,3,4-TriMethyl. We still haven't added the main chain. Notice that the main chain has 6 carbon atoms. 6 is represented with Hex. And notice how there are only single bonds so we will use ane. Hence, We have HexAne. The answer is 3,3,4-TrimethylHexane

I tried my best to explain. Let me know If there is a way to improve this answer. I kind of suck at explaining. Feel free to ask me again if you still didn't understand this.

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