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In the text Chemistry: The Central Science, the inside of a grapefruit is classified as a homogeneous mixture. Unless I’m missing something, to me it would be a heterogenous mixture owing to pulp, seeds, and ultimately the fact that cells are not homogenous. Is this a mistake in the text, and, if not, what am I missing?

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    $\begingroup$ Your interpretation sounds reasonable to me, but I’m no grapefruit expert. :-) If it’s physically separable, it’s definitely not homogenous. $\endgroup$
    – ringo
    Aug 10 '18 at 19:28
  • $\begingroup$ Yes, it is heterogeneous (unless it's put into an ultrasonic cell disruptor... and even them I'd quibble). $\endgroup$ Aug 10 '18 at 21:17
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    $\begingroup$ Which edition are you working out of? Searching through the text of the 12th ed only shows one mention of grapefruit in the acid-base intro. If it's newer than 12th, then they added that part quite recently and hence wouldn't have had as much proofreading on it. $\endgroup$
    – chipbuster
    Aug 10 '18 at 21:50
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According to Wikipedia:

In chemistry, a heterogeneous mixture consists of either or both of a) multiple states of matter or b) hydrophilic and hydrophobic substances in one mixture

The inside of a grapefruit is clearly made up of multiple states of matter (solid and liquid), and is thus heterogeneous. Text books sometimes contain errors, and that appears to be the case here.

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