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A molecule on the surface of room-temperature water shoots off the surface of said water, or in other words, it "evaporates." It does so because it gained kinetic energy x${x}$, and x${x}$ was great enough to counteract the pressure of the air surrounding it.

Is it true that this x${x}$ would be similar (the same or greater) as the average kinetic energy level of a molecule in a pot of boiling water?

Reasoning for thinking this: boiling is when the vapor pressure = the pressure of the atmosphere.

A molecule on the surface of room-temperature water shoots off the surface of said water, or in other words, it "evaporates." It does so because it gained kinetic energy x, and x was great enough to counteract the pressure of the air surrounding it.

Is it true that this x would be similar (the same or greater) as the average kinetic energy level of a molecule in a pot of boiling water?

Reasoning for thinking this: boiling is when the vapor pressure = the pressure of the atmosphere.

A molecule on the surface of room-temperature water shoots off the surface of said water, or in other words, it "evaporates." It does so because it gained kinetic energy ${x}$, and ${x}$ was great enough to counteract the pressure of the air surrounding it.

Is it true that this ${x}$ would be similar (the same or greater) as the average kinetic energy level of a molecule in a pot of boiling water?

Reasoning for thinking this: boiling is when the vapor pressure = the pressure of the atmosphere.

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Is it true that an evaporating molecule has the same kinetic energy as a molecule in a pot of boiling water?

A molecule on the surface of room-temperature water shoots off the surface of said water, or in other words, it "evaporates." It does so because it gained kinetic energy x, and x was great enough to counteract the pressure of the air surrounding it.

Is it true that this x would be similar (the same or greater) as the average kinetic energy level of a molecule in a pot of boiling water?

Reasoning for thinking this: boiling is when the vapor pressure = the pressure of the atmosphere.