10 names in lowercase
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  1. Group 13: $\ce{BH3}$: borane, $\ce{AlH3}$: alumane, $\ce{GaH3}$: gallane, etc. Pattern: half of the element name suffixed by "-ane".
  2. Group 14: $\ce{CH4}$: methane, $\ce{SiH4}$: silane, $\ce{GeH4}$: germane. Pattern: half of the element name suffixed by "-ane". Methane is a remnant of organic chemistry, and is a part of nomenclature of hydrocarbons.
  3. Group 15: $\ce{NH3}$: ammonia, $\ce{PH3}$: phosphine, $\ce{AsH3}$: arsine, $\ce{SbH3}$: stibine, $\ce{BiH3}$: bismuthine. Pattern: half of the element name suffixed by "-ine". "Ammonia"'s origins, though, are a bit more interesting (read the Wikipedia page).
  4. Group 16: $\ce{H2O}$: water, $\ce{H2S}$: hydrogen sulfide, $\ce{H2Se}$: Hydrogenhydrogen selenide, $\ce{H2Te}$: Hydrogenhydrogen telluride. Note that while "oxidane", "sulfane", "selane", etc. are acceptable, in the case of oxidane, that name is only used when denoting water derivatives. Read Do chemists refer to water as "dihydrogen monoxide"? and Does water have a chemical name?.
  5. Group 17: they are simply named as "hydrogen halide". Example: "hydrogen bromide" $\ce{(HBr)}$. It is not named "hydrogen monobromide", as you may believe from earlier examples, and that it because hydrogen can only form a single halide with the halogens (see Note 3 below).
  1. Group 13: $\ce{BH3}$: borane, $\ce{AlH3}$: alumane, $\ce{GaH3}$: gallane, etc. Pattern: half of the element name suffixed by "-ane".
  2. Group 14: $\ce{CH4}$: methane, $\ce{SiH4}$: silane, $\ce{GeH4}$: germane. Pattern: half of the element name suffixed by "-ane". Methane is a remnant of organic chemistry, and is a part of nomenclature of hydrocarbons.
  3. Group 15: $\ce{NH3}$: ammonia, $\ce{PH3}$: phosphine, $\ce{AsH3}$: arsine, $\ce{SbH3}$: stibine, $\ce{BiH3}$: bismuthine. Pattern: half of the element name suffixed by "-ine". "Ammonia"'s origins, though, are a bit more interesting (read the Wikipedia page).
  4. Group 16: $\ce{H2O}$: water, $\ce{H2S}$: hydrogen sulfide, $\ce{H2Se}$: Hydrogen selenide, $\ce{H2Te}$: Hydrogen telluride. Note that while "oxidane", "sulfane", "selane", etc. are acceptable, in the case of oxidane, that name is only used when denoting water derivatives. Read Do chemists refer to water as "dihydrogen monoxide"? and Does water have a chemical name?.
  5. Group 17: they are simply named as "hydrogen halide". Example: "hydrogen bromide" $\ce{(HBr)}$. It is not named "hydrogen monobromide", as you may believe from earlier examples, and that it because hydrogen can only form a single halide with the halogens (see Note 3 below).
  1. Group 13: $\ce{BH3}$: borane, $\ce{AlH3}$: alumane, $\ce{GaH3}$: gallane, etc. Pattern: half of the element name suffixed by "-ane".
  2. Group 14: $\ce{CH4}$: methane, $\ce{SiH4}$: silane, $\ce{GeH4}$: germane. Pattern: half of the element name suffixed by "-ane". Methane is a remnant of organic chemistry, and is a part of nomenclature of hydrocarbons.
  3. Group 15: $\ce{NH3}$: ammonia, $\ce{PH3}$: phosphine, $\ce{AsH3}$: arsine, $\ce{SbH3}$: stibine, $\ce{BiH3}$: bismuthine. Pattern: half of the element name suffixed by "-ine". "Ammonia"'s origins, though, are a bit more interesting (read the Wikipedia page).
  4. Group 16: $\ce{H2O}$: water, $\ce{H2S}$: hydrogen sulfide, $\ce{H2Se}$: hydrogen selenide, $\ce{H2Te}$: hydrogen telluride. Note that while "oxidane", "sulfane", "selane", etc. are acceptable, in the case of oxidane, that name is only used when denoting water derivatives. Read Do chemists refer to water as "dihydrogen monoxide"? and Does water have a chemical name?.
  5. Group 17: they are simply named as "hydrogen halide". Example: "hydrogen bromide" $\ce{(HBr)}$. It is not named "hydrogen monobromide", as you may believe from earlier examples, and that it because hydrogen can only form a single halide with the halogens (see Note 3 below).
9 in ur answer , u have given arsine name to both H2Se and AsH3 . I edited the part where u wrote arsine name for H2Se and AsH3 stands for stibine as wrote in line 2 for Group 15 elements. You wrote Hydrogen selenide for AsH3.
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  1. Group 13: $\ce{BH3}$: borane, $\ce{AlH3}$: alumane, $\ce{GaH3}$: gallane, etc. Pattern: half of the element name suffixed by "-ane".
  2. Group 14: $\ce{CH4}$: methane, $\ce{SiH4}$: silane, $\ce{GeH4}$: germane. Pattern: half of the element name suffixed by "-ane". Methane is a remnant of organic chemistry, and is a part of nomenclature of hydrocarbons.
  3. Group 15: $\ce{NH3}$: ammonia, $\ce{PH3}$: phosphine, $\ce{AsH3}$: arsine, $\ce{SbH3}$: stibine, $\ce{BiH3}$: bismuthine. Pattern: half of the element name suffixed by "-ine". "Ammonia"'s origins, though, are a bit more interesting (read the Wikipedia page).
  4. Group 16: $\ce{H2O}$: water, $\ce{H2S}$: hydrogen sulfide, $\ce{H2Se}$: Hydrogen selenide, $\ce{SbH3}$$\ce{H2Te}$: stibine, etcHydrogen telluride. Note that while "oxidane", "sulfane", "selane", etc. are acceptable, in the case of oxidane, that name is only used when denoting water derivatives. Read Do chemists refer to water as "dihydrogen monoxide"? and Does water have a chemical name?.
  5. Group 17: they are simply named as "hydrogen halide". Example: "hydrogen bromide" $\ce{(HBr)}$. It is not named "hydrogen monobromide", as you may believe from earlier examples, and that it because hydrogen can only form a single halide with the halogens (see Note 3 below).
  1. Group 13: $\ce{BH3}$: borane, $\ce{AlH3}$: alumane, $\ce{GaH3}$: gallane, etc. Pattern: half of the element name suffixed by "-ane".
  2. Group 14: $\ce{CH4}$: methane, $\ce{SiH4}$: silane, $\ce{GeH4}$: germane. Pattern: half of the element name suffixed by "-ane". Methane is a remnant of organic chemistry, and is a part of nomenclature of hydrocarbons.
  3. Group 15: $\ce{NH3}$: ammonia, $\ce{PH3}$: phosphine, $\ce{AsH3}$: arsine, $\ce{SbH3}$: stibine, $\ce{BiH3}$: bismuthine. Pattern: half of the element name suffixed by "-ine". "Ammonia"'s origins, though, are a bit more interesting (read the Wikipedia page).
  4. Group 16: $\ce{H2O}$: water, $\ce{H2S}$: hydrogen sulfide, $\ce{H2Se}$: Hydrogen selenide, $\ce{SbH3}$: stibine, etc. Note that while "oxidane", "sulfane", "selane", etc. are acceptable, in the case of oxidane, that name is only used when denoting water derivatives. Read Do chemists refer to water as "dihydrogen monoxide"? and Does water have a chemical name?.
  5. Group 17: they are simply named as "hydrogen halide". Example: "hydrogen bromide" $\ce{(HBr)}$. It is not named "hydrogen monobromide", as you may believe from earlier examples, and that it because hydrogen can only form a single halide with the halogens (see Note 3 below).
  1. Group 13: $\ce{BH3}$: borane, $\ce{AlH3}$: alumane, $\ce{GaH3}$: gallane, etc. Pattern: half of the element name suffixed by "-ane".
  2. Group 14: $\ce{CH4}$: methane, $\ce{SiH4}$: silane, $\ce{GeH4}$: germane. Pattern: half of the element name suffixed by "-ane". Methane is a remnant of organic chemistry, and is a part of nomenclature of hydrocarbons.
  3. Group 15: $\ce{NH3}$: ammonia, $\ce{PH3}$: phosphine, $\ce{AsH3}$: arsine, $\ce{SbH3}$: stibine, $\ce{BiH3}$: bismuthine. Pattern: half of the element name suffixed by "-ine". "Ammonia"'s origins, though, are a bit more interesting (read the Wikipedia page).
  4. Group 16: $\ce{H2O}$: water, $\ce{H2S}$: hydrogen sulfide, $\ce{H2Se}$: Hydrogen selenide, $\ce{H2Te}$: Hydrogen telluride. Note that while "oxidane", "sulfane", "selane", etc. are acceptable, in the case of oxidane, that name is only used when denoting water derivatives. Read Do chemists refer to water as "dihydrogen monoxide"? and Does water have a chemical name?.
  5. Group 17: they are simply named as "hydrogen halide". Example: "hydrogen bromide" $\ce{(HBr)}$. It is not named "hydrogen monobromide", as you may believe from earlier examples, and that it because hydrogen can only form a single halide with the halogens (see Note 3 below).
8 in ur answer , u have given arsine name to both H2Se and AsH3 . I edited the part where u wrote arsine name for H2Se and AsH3 stands for stibine as wrote in line 2 for Group 15 elements. You wrote Hydrogen selenide for AsH3.
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  1. Group 13: $\ce{BH3}$: borane, $\ce{AlH3}$: alumane, $\ce{GaH3}$: gallane, etc. Pattern: half of the element name suffixed by "-ane".
  2. Group 14: $\ce{CH4}$: methane, $\ce{SiH4}$: silane, $\ce{GeH4}$: germane. Pattern: half of the element name suffixed by "-ane". Methane is a remnant of organic chemistry, and is a part of nomenclature of hydrocarbons.
  3. Group 15: $\ce{NH3}$: ammonia, $\ce{PH3}$: phosphine, $\ce{AsH3}$: arsine, $\ce{SbH3}$: stibine, $\ce{BiH3}$: bismuthine. Pattern: half of the element name suffixed by "-ine". "Ammonia"'s origins, though, are a bit more interesting (read the Wikipedia page).
  4. Group 16: $\ce{H2O}$: water, $\ce{H2S}$: hydrogen sulfide, $\ce{H2Se}$: arsineHydrogen selenide, $\ce{SbH3}$: hydrogen selenidestibine, etc. Note that while "oxidane", "sulfane", "selane", etc. are acceptable, in the case of oxidane, that name is only used when denoting water derivatives. Read Do chemists refer to water as "dihydrogen monoxide"? and Does water have a chemical name?.
  5. Group 17: they are simply named as "hydrogen halide". Example: "hydrogen bromide" $\ce{(HBr)}$. It is not named "hydrogen monobromide", as you may believe from earlier examples, and that it because hydrogen can only form a single halide with the halogens (see Note 3 below).
  1. Group 13: $\ce{BH3}$: borane, $\ce{AlH3}$: alumane, $\ce{GaH3}$: gallane, etc. Pattern: half of the element name suffixed by "-ane".
  2. Group 14: $\ce{CH4}$: methane, $\ce{SiH4}$: silane, $\ce{GeH4}$: germane. Pattern: half of the element name suffixed by "-ane". Methane is a remnant of organic chemistry, and is a part of nomenclature of hydrocarbons.
  3. Group 15: $\ce{NH3}$: ammonia, $\ce{PH3}$: phosphine, $\ce{AsH3}$: arsine, $\ce{SbH3}$: stibine, $\ce{BiH3}$: bismuthine. Pattern: half of the element name suffixed by "-ine". "Ammonia"'s origins, though, are a bit more interesting (read the Wikipedia page).
  4. Group 16: $\ce{H2O}$: water, $\ce{H2S}$: hydrogen sulfide, $\ce{H2Se}$: arsine, $\ce{SbH3}$: hydrogen selenide, etc. Note that while "oxidane", "sulfane", "selane", etc. are acceptable, in the case of oxidane, that name is only used when denoting water derivatives. Read Do chemists refer to water as "dihydrogen monoxide"? and Does water have a chemical name?.
  5. Group 17: they are simply named as "hydrogen halide". Example: "hydrogen bromide" $\ce{(HBr)}$. It is not named "hydrogen monobromide", as you may believe from earlier examples, and that it because hydrogen can only form a single halide with the halogens (see Note 3 below).
  1. Group 13: $\ce{BH3}$: borane, $\ce{AlH3}$: alumane, $\ce{GaH3}$: gallane, etc. Pattern: half of the element name suffixed by "-ane".
  2. Group 14: $\ce{CH4}$: methane, $\ce{SiH4}$: silane, $\ce{GeH4}$: germane. Pattern: half of the element name suffixed by "-ane". Methane is a remnant of organic chemistry, and is a part of nomenclature of hydrocarbons.
  3. Group 15: $\ce{NH3}$: ammonia, $\ce{PH3}$: phosphine, $\ce{AsH3}$: arsine, $\ce{SbH3}$: stibine, $\ce{BiH3}$: bismuthine. Pattern: half of the element name suffixed by "-ine". "Ammonia"'s origins, though, are a bit more interesting (read the Wikipedia page).
  4. Group 16: $\ce{H2O}$: water, $\ce{H2S}$: hydrogen sulfide, $\ce{H2Se}$: Hydrogen selenide, $\ce{SbH3}$: stibine, etc. Note that while "oxidane", "sulfane", "selane", etc. are acceptable, in the case of oxidane, that name is only used when denoting water derivatives. Read Do chemists refer to water as "dihydrogen monoxide"? and Does water have a chemical name?.
  5. Group 17: they are simply named as "hydrogen halide". Example: "hydrogen bromide" $\ce{(HBr)}$. It is not named "hydrogen monobromide", as you may believe from earlier examples, and that it because hydrogen can only form a single halide with the halogens (see Note 3 below).
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6 names corrected according to IUPAC recommendations as well as ISO standards
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5 add necessary expansion: https://chemistry.meta.stackexchange.com/questions/3698/canonical-qa-proposing-a-patronage-system/3700#comment7569_3700
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