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I have a standard copper etching solution of 1 part 10M HCL$\pu{10M}$ $\ce{HCL}$ and 2 parts 3% H2O2$\ce{H2O2}$ (as described in numerous places online).

I previously had this stored in a tightly-sealed glass bottle, as described in the instructions I followed and general acid storage instructions.

However, my solution seems to be outgassing hydrogen or chlorine gas quite significantly, and when I opened the sealed container a few days later it violently liberated much of its contents into my face. (I was wearing a partial face shield and immediately went under the shower, so no ill effects were observed).

I know that for some chemicals that self-pressurize, such as cryogenic nitrogen, the storage method is essentially constant venting - is that what I'll have to resort to?

I have a standard copper etching solution of 1 part 10M HCL and 2 parts 3% H2O2 (as described in numerous places online).

I previously had this stored in a tightly-sealed glass bottle, as described in the instructions I followed and general acid storage instructions.

However, my solution seems to be outgassing hydrogen or chlorine gas quite significantly, and when I opened the sealed container a few days later it violently liberated much of its contents into my face. (I was wearing a partial face shield and immediately went under the shower, so no ill effects were observed).

I know that for some chemicals that self-pressurize, such as cryogenic nitrogen, the storage method is essentially constant venting - is that what I'll have to resort to?

I have a standard copper etching solution of 1 part $\pu{10M}$ $\ce{HCL}$ and 2 parts 3% $\ce{H2O2}$ (as described in numerous places online).

I previously had this stored in a tightly-sealed glass bottle, as described in the instructions I followed and general acid storage instructions.

However, my solution seems to be outgassing hydrogen or chlorine gas quite significantly, and when I opened the sealed container a few days later it violently liberated much of its contents into my face. (I was wearing a partial face shield and immediately went under the shower, so no ill effects were observed).

I know that for some chemicals that self-pressurize, such as cryogenic nitrogen, the storage method is essentially constant venting - is that what I'll have to resort to?

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How can I safely store highly outgassing self-pressurizing chemicals?

I have a standard copper etching solution of 1 part 10M HCL and 2 parts 3% H2O2 (as described in numerous places online).

I previously had this stored in a tightly-sealed glass bottle, as described in the instructions I followed and general acid storage instructions.

However, my solution seems to be outgassing hydrogen or chlorine gas quite significantly, and when I opened the sealed container a few days later it violently liberated much of its contents into my face. (I was wearing a partial face shield and immediately went under the shower, so no ill effects were observed).

I know that for some chemicals that self-pressurize, such as cryogenic nitrogen, the storage method is essentially constant venting - is that what I'll have to resort to?