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I would like to ask a question about europium's stability in the $+2$ and $+3$ oxidation state.

The electronic configuration of europium in its neutral state is $\ce{[Xe] 4f^7 6s^2}$$\ce{[Xe] (4f)^7 (6s)^2}$.

Now, when in the $+2$ oxidation state, the electronic configuration is $\ce{[Xe] 4f^7}$$\ce{[Xe] (4f)^7}$ and in the $+3$ oxidation state, it is $\ce{[Xe] 4f^6}$$\ce{[Xe] (4f)^6}$.

Now, I thought the $+2$ oxidation state is more stable because it's a half-filled $\ce{f}$ sub-shell so there is less mutual repulsion between electrons in the same sub-shell.

However, an article from nature.com reads the following:

Europium metal is now known to be highly reactive; the element's most stable oxidation state is +3, but the +2 state also occurs in solid-state compounds and water.

Now, I would like to ask, how is it possible for europium to be most stable in its $+3$ oxidation state, knowing what I have mentioned above?

I would like to ask a question about europium's stability in the $+2$ and $+3$ oxidation state.

The electronic configuration of europium in its neutral state is $\ce{[Xe] 4f^7 6s^2}$.

Now, when in the $+2$ oxidation state, the electronic configuration is $\ce{[Xe] 4f^7}$ and in the $+3$ oxidation state, it is $\ce{[Xe] 4f^6}$.

Now, I thought the $+2$ oxidation state is more stable because it's a half-filled $\ce{f}$ sub-shell so there is less mutual repulsion between electrons in the same sub-shell.

However, an article from nature.com reads the following:

Europium metal is now known to be highly reactive; the element's most stable oxidation state is +3, but the +2 state also occurs in solid-state compounds and water.

Now, I would like to ask, how is it possible for europium to be most stable in its $+3$ oxidation state, knowing what I have mentioned above?

I would like to ask a question about europium's stability in the $+2$ and $+3$ oxidation state.

The electronic configuration of europium in its neutral state is $\ce{[Xe] (4f)^7 (6s)^2}$.

Now, when in the $+2$ oxidation state, the electronic configuration is $\ce{[Xe] (4f)^7}$ and in the $+3$ oxidation state, it is $\ce{[Xe] (4f)^6}$.

Now, I thought the $+2$ oxidation state is more stable because it's a half-filled $\ce{f}$ sub-shell so there is less mutual repulsion between electrons in the same sub-shell.

However, an article from nature.com reads the following:

Europium metal is now known to be highly reactive; the element's most stable oxidation state is +3, but the +2 state also occurs in solid-state compounds and water.

Now, I would like to ask, how is it possible for europium to be most stable in its $+3$ oxidation state, knowing what I have mentioned above?

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Europium stability in $+2$+2 and $+3$+3 state

I would like to ask a question about Europium'seuropium's stability in the $+2$ and $+3$ oxidation state.

The electronic configuration of Europiumeuropium in its neutral state is $\ce{[Xe] 4f^7 6s^2}$.

Now, when in the $+2$ oxidation state, the electronic configuration is $\ce{[Xe] 4f^7}$ and in the $+3$ oxidation state, it is $\ce{[Xe] 4f^6}$.

Now, I thought the $+2$ oxidation state is more stable because it's a half-filled f$\ce{f}$ sub-shell so there is less mutual repulsion between electrons in the same sub-shell.

However, an article from nature.com reads the following:

Europium metal is now known to be highly reactive; the element's most stable oxidation state is +3, but the +2 state also occurs in solid-state compounds and water.

Now, I would like to ask, how is it possible for Europiumeuropium to be most stable in its $+3$ oxidation state, knowing what I have mentioned above?

Europium stability in $+2$ and $+3$ state

I would like to ask a question about Europium's stability in the $+2$ and $+3$ oxidation state.

The electronic configuration of Europium in its neutral state is $\ce{[Xe] 4f^7 6s^2}$.

Now, when in the $+2$ oxidation state, the electronic configuration is $\ce{[Xe] 4f^7}$ and in the $+3$ oxidation state, it is $\ce{[Xe] 4f^6}$.

Now, I thought the $+2$ oxidation state is more stable because it's a half-filled f sub-shell so there is less mutual repulsion between electrons in the same sub-shell.

However, an article from nature.com reads the following:

Europium metal is now known to be highly reactive; the element's most stable oxidation state is +3, but the +2 state also occurs in solid-state compounds and water.

Now, I would like to ask, how is it possible for Europium to be most stable in its $+3$ oxidation state, knowing what I have mentioned above?

Europium stability in +2 and +3 state

I would like to ask a question about europium's stability in the $+2$ and $+3$ oxidation state.

The electronic configuration of europium in its neutral state is $\ce{[Xe] 4f^7 6s^2}$.

Now, when in the $+2$ oxidation state, the electronic configuration is $\ce{[Xe] 4f^7}$ and in the $+3$ oxidation state, it is $\ce{[Xe] 4f^6}$.

Now, I thought the $+2$ oxidation state is more stable because it's a half-filled $\ce{f}$ sub-shell so there is less mutual repulsion between electrons in the same sub-shell.

However, an article from nature.com reads the following:

Europium metal is now known to be highly reactive; the element's most stable oxidation state is +3, but the +2 state also occurs in solid-state compounds and water.

Now, I would like to ask, how is it possible for europium to be most stable in its $+3$ oxidation state, knowing what I have mentioned above?

1
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Europium stability in $+2$ and $+3$ state

I would like to ask a question about Europium's stability in the $+2$ and $+3$ oxidation state.

The electronic configuration of Europium in its neutral state is $\ce{[Xe] 4f^7 6s^2}$.

Now, when in the $+2$ oxidation state, the electronic configuration is $\ce{[Xe] 4f^7}$ and in the $+3$ oxidation state, it is $\ce{[Xe] 4f^6}$.

Now, I thought the $+2$ oxidation state is more stable because it's a half-filled f sub-shell so there is less mutual repulsion between electrons in the same sub-shell.

However, an article from nature.com reads the following:

Europium metal is now known to be highly reactive; the element's most stable oxidation state is +3, but the +2 state also occurs in solid-state compounds and water.

Now, I would like to ask, how is it possible for Europium to be most stable in its $+3$ oxidation state, knowing what I have mentioned above?