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My answer is a carbon-copy of hBy2PyhBy2Py's answer except to outline the specific damage that would occur in each case. And to add another candidate, potassium hydroxide$\ce{KOH}$.

Potassium permanganate ($\ce{KMnO4}$)

This is probably the most innocuous. It has antiseptic properties and I wouldn't consider it especially dangerous. That being said in high concentrations caustic burns have been reported. These sort of concentration is not likely to be encountered in a high school laboratory though.

Visually this spill would be the most spectacular. It is very strongly colored even in dilute solutions. It will stain clothes a bright purple color. The permangenate ion then reduces to a kind of gross brown colour over time.

Sulfuric acid ($\ce{H2SO4}$)

This, and the other two acids below, is substantially more dangerous than the $\ce{KMnO4}$ above. A 1 mol.L$^{-1}$ (or perhaps 2 mol.L$^{-1}$, again, I'm not sure the max allowable concentration in a high school lab) solution of this acid given enough time will slowly degrade most fabrics. It turns paper a brown color as it slowly oxidizes the cellulose in it over time. A similar reaction would occur with cotton I assume.

I'm not sure how bad any burns to the skin would be from solutions of the above concentrations. That being said, I would definitely want to wash myself if I spilled any quantity on me though.

Hydrochloric acid ($\ce{HCl}$) and Nitric acid ($\ce{HNO3}$)

Much of what was said for sulfuric acid above can be said for these two; though, these two in high enough concentration though can also produce noxious fumes. Hydrogen chloride ($\ce{HCl}$) gas in the case of hydrochloric acid, and Nitrogen dioxide ($\ce{NO2}$) for nitric acid. The fumes of these two gasses are highly toxic. To achieve these gases though you'd need to have a highly concentrated solution, again above a concentration I'd expect to have a modern high school lab.

Sodium hydroxide ($\ce{NaOH}$)

I'm not sure of the clothes destroying nature of sodium hydroxide (sometimes called lye), but it would definitely give you issues at a concentration found in a high school lab. Any hydroxides are going to be especially dangerous as they can convert the naturally occurring fats and oils in your skin in to soap. This process is called saponification. If you get some on yourself and it's left unwashed you will feel your fingers and hands become slimy from the soaps on your fingers. It feels like when you have soapy water on your fingers.

Potassium hydroxide ($\ce{KOH}$)

This is an extra compound I've added. It's a hydroxide like the sodium hydroxide above, and so everything I've said there applies to it too. Potassium hydroxide is a stronger base than sodium hydroxide and so its effects will be felt at a lower concentration. A 2 mol.L$^{-1}$ solution will definitely cause saponification. And so, if potassium hydroxide were to be found in a high school lab it might be found at a concentration that would cause chemical burns.

My answer is a carbon-copy of hBy2Py's answer except to outline the specific damage that would occur in each case. And to add another candidate, potassium hydroxide$\ce{KOH}$.

Potassium permanganate ($\ce{KMnO4}$)

This is probably the most innocuous. It has antiseptic properties and I wouldn't consider it especially dangerous. That being said in high concentrations caustic burns have been reported. These sort of concentration is not likely to be encountered in a high school laboratory though.

Visually this spill would be the most spectacular. It is very strongly colored even in dilute solutions. It will stain clothes a bright purple color. The permangenate ion then reduces to a kind of gross brown colour over time.

Sulfuric acid ($\ce{H2SO4}$)

This, and the other two acids below, is substantially more dangerous than the $\ce{KMnO4}$ above. A 1 mol.L$^{-1}$ (or perhaps 2 mol.L$^{-1}$, again, I'm not sure the max allowable concentration in a high school lab) solution of this acid given enough time will slowly degrade most fabrics. It turns paper a brown color as it slowly oxidizes the cellulose in it over time. A similar reaction would occur with cotton I assume.

I'm not sure how bad any burns to the skin would be from solutions of the above concentrations. That being said, I would definitely want to wash myself if I spilled any quantity on me though.

Hydrochloric acid ($\ce{HCl}$) and Nitric acid ($\ce{HNO3}$)

Much of what was said for sulfuric acid above can be said for these two; though, these two in high enough concentration though can also produce noxious fumes. Hydrogen chloride ($\ce{HCl}$) gas in the case of hydrochloric acid, and Nitrogen dioxide ($\ce{NO2}$) for nitric acid. The fumes of these two gasses are highly toxic. To achieve these gases though you'd need to have a highly concentrated solution, again above a concentration I'd expect to have a modern high school lab.

Sodium hydroxide ($\ce{NaOH}$)

I'm not sure of the clothes destroying nature of sodium hydroxide (sometimes called lye), but it would definitely give you issues at a concentration found in a high school lab. Any hydroxides are going to be especially dangerous as they can convert the naturally occurring fats and oils in your skin in to soap. This process is called saponification. If you get some on yourself and it's left unwashed you will feel your fingers and hands become slimy from the soaps on your fingers. It feels like when you have soapy water on your fingers.

Potassium hydroxide ($\ce{KOH}$)

This is an extra compound I've added. It's a hydroxide like the sodium hydroxide above, and so everything I've said there applies to it too. Potassium hydroxide is a stronger base than sodium hydroxide and so its effects will be felt at a lower concentration. A 2 mol.L$^{-1}$ solution will definitely cause saponification. And so, if potassium hydroxide were to be found in a high school lab it might be found at a concentration that would cause chemical burns.

My answer is a carbon-copy of hBy2Py's answer except to outline the specific damage that would occur in each case. And to add another candidate, potassium hydroxide$\ce{KOH}$.

Potassium permanganate ($\ce{KMnO4}$)

This is probably the most innocuous. It has antiseptic properties and I wouldn't consider it especially dangerous. That being said in high concentrations caustic burns have been reported. These sort of concentration is not likely to be encountered in a high school laboratory though.

Visually this spill would be the most spectacular. It is very strongly colored even in dilute solutions. It will stain clothes a bright purple color. The permangenate ion then reduces to a kind of gross brown colour over time.

Sulfuric acid ($\ce{H2SO4}$)

This, and the other two acids below, is substantially more dangerous than the $\ce{KMnO4}$ above. A 1 mol.L$^{-1}$ (or perhaps 2 mol.L$^{-1}$, again, I'm not sure the max allowable concentration in a high school lab) solution of this acid given enough time will slowly degrade most fabrics. It turns paper a brown color as it slowly oxidizes the cellulose in it over time. A similar reaction would occur with cotton I assume.

I'm not sure how bad any burns to the skin would be from solutions of the above concentrations. That being said, I would definitely want to wash myself if I spilled any quantity on me though.

Hydrochloric acid ($\ce{HCl}$) and Nitric acid ($\ce{HNO3}$)

Much of what was said for sulfuric acid above can be said for these two; though, these two in high enough concentration though can also produce noxious fumes. Hydrogen chloride ($\ce{HCl}$) gas in the case of hydrochloric acid, and Nitrogen dioxide ($\ce{NO2}$) for nitric acid. The fumes of these two gasses are highly toxic. To achieve these gases though you'd need to have a highly concentrated solution, again above a concentration I'd expect to have a modern high school lab.

Sodium hydroxide ($\ce{NaOH}$)

I'm not sure of the clothes destroying nature of sodium hydroxide (sometimes called lye), but it would definitely give you issues at a concentration found in a high school lab. Any hydroxides are going to be especially dangerous as they can convert the naturally occurring fats and oils in your skin in to soap. This process is called saponification. If you get some on yourself and it's left unwashed you will feel your fingers and hands become slimy from the soaps on your fingers. It feels like when you have soapy water on your fingers.

Potassium hydroxide ($\ce{KOH}$)

This is an extra compound I've added. It's a hydroxide like the sodium hydroxide above, and so everything I've said there applies to it too. Potassium hydroxide is a stronger base than sodium hydroxide and so its effects will be felt at a lower concentration. A 2 mol.L$^{-1}$ solution will definitely cause saponification. And so, if potassium hydroxide were to be found in a high school lab it might be found at a concentration that would cause chemical burns.

2 permangenate *reduces* over time. Oxidises -> reduces to reflect that.
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My answer is a carbon-copy of hBy2Py's answer except to outline the specific damage that would occur in each case. And to add another candidate, potassium hydroxide$\ce{KOH}$.

Potassium permanganate ($\ce{KMnO4}$)

This is probably the most innocuous. It has antiseptic properties and I wouldn't consider it especially dangerous. That being said in high concentrations caustic burns have been reported. These sort of concentration is not likely to be encountered in a high school laboratory though.

Visually this spill would be the most spectacular. It is very strongly colored even in dilute solutions. It will stain clothes a bright purple color, which. The permangenate ion then oxidizesreduces to a kind of gross brown colour over time.

Sulfuric acid ($\ce{H2SO4}$)

This, and the other two acids below, is substantially more dangerous than the $\ce{KMnO4}$ above. A 1 mol.L$^{-1}$ (or perhaps 2 mol.L$^{-1}$, again, I'm not sure the max allowable concentration in a high school lab) solution of this acid given enough time will slowly degrade most fabrics. It turns paper a brown color as it slowly oxidizes the cellulose in it over time. A similar reaction would occur with cotton I assume.

I'm not sure how bad any burns to the skin would be from solutions of the above concentrations. That being said, I would definitely want to wash myself if I spilled any quantity on me though.

Hydrochloric acid ($\ce{HCl}$) and Nitric acid ($\ce{HNO3}$)

Much of what was said for sulfuric acid above can be said for these two; though, these two in high enough concentration though can also produce noxious fumes. Hydrogen chloride ($\ce{HCl}$) gas in the case of hydrochloric acid, and Nitrogen dioxide ($\ce{NO2}$) for nitric acid. The fumes of these two gasses are highly toxic. To achieve these gases though you'd need to have a highly concentrated solution, again above a concentration I'd expect to have a modern high school lab.

Sodium hydroxide ($\ce{NaOH}$)

I'm not sure of the clothes destroying nature of sodium hydroxide (sometimes called lye), but it would definitely give you issues at a concentration found in a high school lab. Any hydroxides are going to be especially dangerous as they can convert the naturally occurring fats and oils in your skin in to soap. This process is called saponification. If you get some on yourself and it's left unwashed you will feel your fingers and hands become slimy from the soaps on your fingers. It feels like when you have soapy water on your fingers.

Potassium hydroxide ($\ce{KOH}$)

This is an extra compound I've added. It's a hydroxide like the sodium hydroxide above, and so everything I've said there applies to it too. Potassium hydroxide is a stronger base than sodium hydroxide and so its effects will be felt at a lower concentration. A 2 mol.L$^{-1}$ solution will definitely cause saponification. And so, if potassium hydroxide were to be found in a high school lab it might be found at a concentration that would cause chemical burns.

My answer is a carbon-copy of hBy2Py's answer except to outline the specific damage that would occur in each case. And to add another candidate, potassium hydroxide$\ce{KOH}$.

Potassium permanganate ($\ce{KMnO4}$)

This is probably the most innocuous. It has antiseptic properties and I wouldn't consider it especially dangerous. That being said in high concentrations caustic burns have been reported. These sort of concentration is not likely to be encountered in a high school laboratory though.

Visually this spill would be the most spectacular. It is very strongly colored even in dilute solutions. It will stain clothes a bright purple color, which then oxidizes to a kind of gross brown colour over time.

Sulfuric acid ($\ce{H2SO4}$)

This, and the other two acids below, is substantially more dangerous than the $\ce{KMnO4}$ above. A 1 mol.L$^{-1}$ (or perhaps 2 mol.L$^{-1}$, again, I'm not sure the max allowable concentration in a high school lab) solution of this acid given enough time will slowly degrade most fabrics. It turns paper a brown color as it slowly oxidizes the cellulose in it over time. A similar reaction would occur with cotton I assume.

I'm not sure how bad any burns to the skin would be from solutions of the above concentrations. That being said, I would definitely want to wash myself if I spilled any quantity on me though.

Hydrochloric acid ($\ce{HCl}$) and Nitric acid ($\ce{HNO3}$)

Much of what was said for sulfuric acid above can be said for these two; though, these two in high enough concentration though can also produce noxious fumes. Hydrogen chloride ($\ce{HCl}$) gas in the case of hydrochloric acid, and Nitrogen dioxide ($\ce{NO2}$) for nitric acid. The fumes of these two gasses are highly toxic. To achieve these gases though you'd need to have a highly concentrated solution, again above a concentration I'd expect to have a modern high school lab.

Sodium hydroxide ($\ce{NaOH}$)

I'm not sure of the clothes destroying nature of sodium hydroxide (sometimes called lye), but it would definitely give you issues at a concentration found in a high school lab. Any hydroxides are going to be especially dangerous as they can convert the naturally occurring fats and oils in your skin in to soap. This process is called saponification. If you get some on yourself and it's left unwashed you will feel your fingers and hands become slimy from the soaps on your fingers. It feels like when you have soapy water on your fingers.

Potassium hydroxide ($\ce{KOH}$)

This is an extra compound I've added. It's a hydroxide like the sodium hydroxide above, and so everything I've said there applies to it too. Potassium hydroxide is a stronger base than sodium hydroxide and so its effects will be felt at a lower concentration. A 2 mol.L$^{-1}$ solution will definitely cause saponification. And so, if potassium hydroxide were to be found in a high school lab it might be found at a concentration that would cause chemical burns.

My answer is a carbon-copy of hBy2Py's answer except to outline the specific damage that would occur in each case. And to add another candidate, potassium hydroxide$\ce{KOH}$.

Potassium permanganate ($\ce{KMnO4}$)

This is probably the most innocuous. It has antiseptic properties and I wouldn't consider it especially dangerous. That being said in high concentrations caustic burns have been reported. These sort of concentration is not likely to be encountered in a high school laboratory though.

Visually this spill would be the most spectacular. It is very strongly colored even in dilute solutions. It will stain clothes a bright purple color. The permangenate ion then reduces to a kind of gross brown colour over time.

Sulfuric acid ($\ce{H2SO4}$)

This, and the other two acids below, is substantially more dangerous than the $\ce{KMnO4}$ above. A 1 mol.L$^{-1}$ (or perhaps 2 mol.L$^{-1}$, again, I'm not sure the max allowable concentration in a high school lab) solution of this acid given enough time will slowly degrade most fabrics. It turns paper a brown color as it slowly oxidizes the cellulose in it over time. A similar reaction would occur with cotton I assume.

I'm not sure how bad any burns to the skin would be from solutions of the above concentrations. That being said, I would definitely want to wash myself if I spilled any quantity on me though.

Hydrochloric acid ($\ce{HCl}$) and Nitric acid ($\ce{HNO3}$)

Much of what was said for sulfuric acid above can be said for these two; though, these two in high enough concentration though can also produce noxious fumes. Hydrogen chloride ($\ce{HCl}$) gas in the case of hydrochloric acid, and Nitrogen dioxide ($\ce{NO2}$) for nitric acid. The fumes of these two gasses are highly toxic. To achieve these gases though you'd need to have a highly concentrated solution, again above a concentration I'd expect to have a modern high school lab.

Sodium hydroxide ($\ce{NaOH}$)

I'm not sure of the clothes destroying nature of sodium hydroxide (sometimes called lye), but it would definitely give you issues at a concentration found in a high school lab. Any hydroxides are going to be especially dangerous as they can convert the naturally occurring fats and oils in your skin in to soap. This process is called saponification. If you get some on yourself and it's left unwashed you will feel your fingers and hands become slimy from the soaps on your fingers. It feels like when you have soapy water on your fingers.

Potassium hydroxide ($\ce{KOH}$)

This is an extra compound I've added. It's a hydroxide like the sodium hydroxide above, and so everything I've said there applies to it too. Potassium hydroxide is a stronger base than sodium hydroxide and so its effects will be felt at a lower concentration. A 2 mol.L$^{-1}$ solution will definitely cause saponification. And so, if potassium hydroxide were to be found in a high school lab it might be found at a concentration that would cause chemical burns.

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My answer is a carbon-copy of hBy2Py's answer except to outline the specific damage that would occur in each case. And to add another candidate, potassium hydroxide$\ce{KOH}$.

Potassium permanganate ($\ce{KMnO4}$)

This is probably the most innocuous. It has antiseptic properties and I wouldn't consider it especially dangerous. That being said in high concentrations caustic burns have been reported. These sort of concentration is not likely to be encountered in a high school laboratory though.

Visually this spill would be the most spectacular. It is very strongly colored even in dilute solutions. It will stain clothes a bright purple color, which then oxidizes to a kind of gross brown colour over time.

Sulfuric acid ($\ce{H2SO4}$)

This, and the other two acids below, is substantially more dangerous than the $\ce{KMnO4}$ above. A 1 mol.L$^{-1}$ (or perhaps 2 mol.L$^{-1}$, again, I'm not sure the max allowable concentration in a high school lab) solution of this acid given enough time will slowly degrade most fabrics. It turns paper a brown color as it slowly oxidizes the cellulose in it over time. A similar reaction would occur with cotton I assume.

I'm not sure how bad any burns to the skin would be from solutions of the above concentrations. That being said, I would definitely want to wash myself if I spilled any quantity on me though.

Hydrochloric acid ($\ce{HCl}$) and Nitric acid ($\ce{HNO3}$)

Much of what was said for sulfuric acid above can be said for these two; though, these two in high enough concentration though can also produce noxious fumes. Hydrogen chloride ($\ce{HCl}$) gas in the case of hydrochloric acid, and Nitrogen dioxide ($\ce{NO2}$) for nitric acid. The fumes of these two gasses are highly toxic. To achieve these gases though you'd need to have a highly concentrated solution, again above a concentration I'd expect to have a modern high school lab.

Sodium hydroxide ($\ce{NaOH}$)

I'm not sure of the clothes destroying nature of sodium hydroxide (sometimes called lye), but it would definitely give you issues at a concentration found in a high school lab. Any hydroxides are going to be especially dangerous as they can convert the naturally occurring fats and oils in your skin in to soap. This process is called saponification. If you get some on yourself and it's left unwashed you will feel your fingers and hands become slimy from the soaps on your fingers. It feels like when you have soapy water on your fingers.

Potassium hydroxide ($\ce{KOH}$)

This is an extra compound I've added. It's a hydroxide like the sodium hydroxide above, and so everything I've said there applies to it too. Potassium hydroxide is a stronger base than sodium hydroxide and so its effects will be felt at a lower concentration. A 2 mol.L$^{-1}$ solution will definitely cause saponification. And so, if potassium hydroxide were to be found in a high school lab it might be found at a concentration that would cause chemical burns.