2 added 9 characters in body
source | link

It can be a probable answer but I am not sure about it.

You are correct to say that easily liquifiable gases have stronger intermolecular forces of attraction (van der Waals forces). As a result of which they are strongly bound to themselves. Consider physisorption, here, the forces between the adsorbate molecules and the adsorbent are weak van der Waals forces. Once the surface area of the adsorbent is completely occupied, the next layer of adsorbate molecules will be bound weakly. So if the gas molecules have stronger van der Waals force of attraction, they would be adsorbed readily in preference to gas molecules having weaker van der Waals forces of attraction.

It can be a probable answer but I am not sure.

You are correct to say that easily liquifiable gases have stronger intermolecular forces of attraction (van der Waals forces). As a result of which they are strongly bound to themselves. Consider physisorption, here, the forces between the adsorbate molecules and the adsorbent are weak van der Waals forces. Once the surface area of the adsorbent is completely occupied, the next layer of adsorbate molecules will be bound weakly. So if the gas molecules have stronger van der Waals force of attraction, they would be adsorbed readily in preference to gas molecules having weaker van der Waals forces of attraction.

It can be a probable answer but I am not sure about it.

You are correct to say that easily liquifiable gases have stronger intermolecular forces of attraction (van der Waals forces). As a result of which they are strongly bound to themselves. Consider physisorption, here, the forces between the adsorbate molecules and the adsorbent are weak van der Waals forces. Once the surface area of the adsorbent is completely occupied, the next layer of adsorbate molecules will be bound weakly. So if the gas molecules have stronger van der Waals force of attraction, they would be adsorbed readily in preference to gas molecules having weaker van der Waals forces of attraction.

1
source | link

It can be a probable answer but I am not sure.

You are correct to say that easily liquifiable gases have stronger intermolecular forces of attraction (van der Waals forces). As a result of which they are strongly bound to themselves. Consider physisorption, here, the forces between the adsorbate molecules and the adsorbent are weak van der Waals forces. Once the surface area of the adsorbent is completely occupied, the next layer of adsorbate molecules will be bound weakly. So if the gas molecules have stronger van der Waals force of attraction, they would be adsorbed readily in preference to gas molecules having weaker van der Waals forces of attraction.