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Repulsion between shared electron pairs shapes the molecule in such a way that enables the pairs to be as far apart as possible. Furthermore, the repulsion between shared and unshared pairs forces bonded pairs closer to one another. These principles of the VSEPR theory and orbital hybridization, in addition to Van der Waals forces, explain the overall shape of a molecule.

In my textbook, however, there was little mention to how polar bonds and the partial charges they cause affect the structure of a molecule. I would expect that poles of the same charge would repel each other and have a profound affect on molecular shape. However, many compounds make me second guess this assumption, including H2O$\ce{H2O}$.

Do polar bonds at all affect molecular shape? Why or why not? If so, to what extent?

Repulsion between shared electron pairs shapes the molecule in such a way that enables the pairs to be as far apart as possible. Furthermore, the repulsion between shared and unshared pairs forces bonded pairs closer to one another. These principles of the VSEPR theory and orbital hybridization, in addition to Van der Waals forces, explain the overall shape of a molecule.

In my textbook, however, there was little mention to how polar bonds and the partial charges they cause affect the structure of a molecule. I would expect that poles of the same charge would repel each other and have a profound affect on molecular shape. However, many compounds make me second guess this assumption, including H2O.

Do polar bonds at all affect molecular shape? Why or why not? If so, to what extent?

Repulsion between shared electron pairs shapes the molecule in such a way that enables the pairs to be as far apart as possible. Furthermore, the repulsion between shared and unshared pairs forces bonded pairs closer to one another. These principles of the VSEPR theory and orbital hybridization, in addition to Van der Waals forces, explain the overall shape of a molecule.

In my textbook, however, there was little mention to how polar bonds and the partial charges they cause affect the structure of a molecule. I would expect that poles of the same charge would repel each other and have a profound affect on molecular shape. However, many compounds make me second guess this assumption, including $\ce{H2O}$.

Do polar bonds at all affect molecular shape? Why or why not? If so, to what extent?

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Do Polar Bonds EffectAffect Molecular Shape?

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Do Polar Bonds andEffect Molecular Shape?

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