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There is no change in molecular structure. A phase change is a physical, not chemical process. To understand why evaporation occurs, you need to realize that every substance has a vapor pressure. This is the pressure exerted by that substance's vapors when it is in thermodynamic equilibrium with its condensed form in a closed system. Substances with high vapor pressures, also called volatile substances, evaporate more quickly than those with low vapor pressures. Consider the illustration below:

http://www.teachnlearnchem.com/Vapor_2.jpg

This illustration shows a liquid coming into thermodynamic equilibrium with its vapor, only made possible by the stopper in the flask. Remove it, and it is no longer a closed system. As vapor leaves the flask, more liquid will vaporize in order to maintain equilibrium, but as the process continues there is eventually no liquid left to replace the vapor as it leaves.

This is why it's important to put the caps back on your gasoline canisters after you're done using them, and how you're able to dry your clothes on a clothes line.

There is no change in molecular structure. A phase change is a physical, not chemical process. To understand why evaporation occurs, you need to realize that every substance has a vapor pressure. This is the pressure exerted by that substance's vapors when it is in thermodynamic equilibrium with its condensed form in a closed system. Substances with high vapor pressures, also called volatile substances, evaporate more quickly than those with low vapor pressures. Consider the illustration below:

http://www.teachnlearnchem.com/Vapor_2.jpg

This illustration shows a liquid coming into thermodynamic equilibrium with its vapor, only made possible by the stopper in the flask. Remove it, and it is no longer a closed system. As vapor leaves the flask, more liquid will vaporize in order to maintain equilibrium, but as the process continues there is eventually no liquid left to replace the vapor as it leaves.

This is why it's important to put the caps back on your gasoline canisters after you're done using them, and how you're able to dry your clothes on a clothes line.

There is no change in molecular structure. A phase change is a physical, not chemical process. To understand why evaporation occurs, you need to realize that every substance has a vapor pressure. This is the pressure exerted by that substance's vapors when it is in thermodynamic equilibrium with its condensed form in a closed system. Substances with high vapor pressures, also called volatile substances, evaporate more quickly than those with low vapor pressures. Consider the illustration below:

This illustration shows a liquid coming into thermodynamic equilibrium with its vapor, only made possible by the stopper in the flask. Remove it, and it is no longer a closed system. As vapor leaves the flask, more liquid will vaporize in order to maintain equilibrium, but as the process continues there is eventually no liquid left to replace the vapor as it leaves.

This is why it's important to put the caps back on your gasoline canisters after you're done using them, and how you're able to dry your clothes on a clothes line.

4 added 1 character in body
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There is no change in molecular structure. A phase change is a physical, not chemical process. To understand why evaporation occurs, you need to realize that every substance has a vapor pressure. This is the pressure exerted by that substance's vapors when it is in thermodynamic equilibrium with its condensed form in a closed system. Substances with high vapor pressures, also called volatile substances, evaporate more quickly than those with low vapor pressures. Consider the illustration below:

http://www.teachnlearnchem.com/Vapor_2.jpg

This illustration shows a liquid coming into thermodynamic equilibrium with its vapor, only made possible by the stopper in the flask. Remove it, and it is no longer a closed system. As vapor leaves the flask, more liquid will vaporize in order to maintain equilibrium, but as the process continues there is eventually no liquid left to replace the vapor as it leaves.

This is why it's important to put the capcaps back on your gasoline canisters after you're done using them, and how you're able to dry your clothes on a clothes line.

There is no change in molecular structure. A phase change is a physical, not chemical process. To understand why evaporation occurs, you need to realize that every substance has a vapor pressure. This is the pressure exerted by that substance's vapors when it is in thermodynamic equilibrium with its condensed form in a closed system. Substances with high vapor pressures, also called volatile substances, evaporate more quickly than those with low vapor pressures. Consider the illustration below:

http://www.teachnlearnchem.com/Vapor_2.jpg

This illustration shows a liquid coming into thermodynamic equilibrium with its vapor, only made possible by the stopper in the flask. Remove it, and it is no longer a closed system. As vapor leaves the flask, more liquid will vaporize in order to maintain equilibrium, but as the process continues there is eventually no liquid left to replace the vapor as it leaves.

This is why it's important to put the cap back on your gasoline canisters after you're done using them, and how you're able to dry your clothes on a clothes line.

There is no change in molecular structure. A phase change is a physical, not chemical process. To understand why evaporation occurs, you need to realize that every substance has a vapor pressure. This is the pressure exerted by that substance's vapors when it is in thermodynamic equilibrium with its condensed form in a closed system. Substances with high vapor pressures, also called volatile substances, evaporate more quickly than those with low vapor pressures. Consider the illustration below:

http://www.teachnlearnchem.com/Vapor_2.jpg

This illustration shows a liquid coming into thermodynamic equilibrium with its vapor, only made possible by the stopper in the flask. Remove it, and it is no longer a closed system. As vapor leaves the flask, more liquid will vaporize in order to maintain equilibrium, but as the process continues there is eventually no liquid left to replace the vapor as it leaves.

This is why it's important to put the caps back on your gasoline canisters after you're done using them, and how you're able to dry your clothes on a clothes line.

3 added 15 characters in body
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There is no change in molecular structure. A phase change is a physical, not chemical process. To understand why evaporation occurs, you need to realize that every substance has a vapor pressure. This is the pressure exerted by that substance's vapors when it is in thermodynamic equilibrium with its condensed form at a given temperature in a closed system. Substances with high vapor pressures, also called volatile substances, evaporate more quickly than those with low vapor pressures. Consider the illustration below:

http://www.teachnlearnchem.com/Vapor_2.jpg

This illustration shows a liquid coming into thermodynamic equilibrium with its vapor, only made possible by the stopper in the flask. Remove it, and it is no longer a closed system. As vapor leaves the flask, more liquid will vaporize in order to maintain equilibrium, but as the process continues there is eventually no liquid left to replace the vapor as it leaves.

This is why it's important to put the cap back on your gasoline canisters after you're done using them, and why wind feels so cold whenhow you're wetable to dry your clothes on a clothes line.

There is no change in molecular structure. A phase change is a physical, not chemical process. To understand why evaporation occurs, you need to realize that every substance has a vapor pressure. This is the pressure exerted by that substance's vapors when it is in thermodynamic equilibrium with its condensed form at a given temperature in a closed system. Substances with high vapor pressures, also called volatile substances, evaporate more quickly than those with low vapor pressures. Consider the illustration below:

http://www.teachnlearnchem.com/Vapor_2.jpg

This illustration shows a liquid coming into thermodynamic equilibrium with its vapor, only made possible by the stopper in the flask. Remove it, and it is no longer a closed system. As vapor leaves the flask, more liquid will vaporize in order to maintain equilibrium, but as the process continues there is eventually no liquid left to replace the vapor as it leaves.

This is why it's important to put the cap back on your gasoline canisters after you're done using them, and why wind feels so cold when you're wet.

There is no change in molecular structure. A phase change is a physical, not chemical process. To understand why evaporation occurs, you need to realize that every substance has a vapor pressure. This is the pressure exerted by that substance's vapors when it is in thermodynamic equilibrium with its condensed form in a closed system. Substances with high vapor pressures, also called volatile substances, evaporate more quickly than those with low vapor pressures. Consider the illustration below:

http://www.teachnlearnchem.com/Vapor_2.jpg

This illustration shows a liquid coming into thermodynamic equilibrium with its vapor, only made possible by the stopper in the flask. Remove it, and it is no longer a closed system. As vapor leaves the flask, more liquid will vaporize in order to maintain equilibrium, but as the process continues there is eventually no liquid left to replace the vapor as it leaves.

This is why it's important to put the cap back on your gasoline canisters after you're done using them, and how you're able to dry your clothes on a clothes line.

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