Tweeted twitter.com/StackChemistry/status/818671735738421248
5 Text in titles is better than formulae. They turn up in the body anyway.
| link

Why does CH3Clchloromethane have a larger dipole moment than CHCl3chloroform?

4 added 81 characters in body; edited tags; edited title
source | link

Why does $CH_3Cl$CH3Cl have morea larger dipole moment than $CHCl_3$CHCl3?

Why does $CH_3Cl$$\ce{CH3Cl}$, methyl chloride, have morea larger dipole moment than $CHCl_3$$\ce{CHCl3}$, chloroform?  

Let us consider $C-Cl$$\ce{C-Cl}$ bond moment to be $x$ and that of $C-H$$\ce{C-H}$ bond to be $y$.

In $CCl_4$$\ce{CCl4}$, the dipole moment of any three C-Cl$\ce{C-Cl}$ atoms is balanced by the dipole moment of the fourth $C-Cl$$\ce{C-Cl}$ bond dipole moment. This means the resultant of dipole moment of three $ 3\ C-Cl$$\ce{C-Cl}$ bonds in tetrahedral structure is equal to $x$, which is equal and opposite to the dipole moment $x$ of the fourth $C-Cl$$\ce{C-Cl}$ bond.
Now

Now, when we replace one of the chlorines with a hydrogen, the net dipole moment equals $x+y$, (as they are in the same directions). Similarly if we carry out the same procedure for $CH_3Cl$$\ce{CH3Cl}$ it can be proved that its dipole moment is also $x+y$.

enter image description here
Where have I gone wrong?

Why does $CH_3Cl$ have more dipole moment than $CHCl_3$

Why does $CH_3Cl$ have more dipole moment than $CHCl_3$?  

Let us consider $C-Cl$ bond moment to be $x$ and that of $C-H$ bond to be $y$.

In $CCl_4$, the dipole moment of any three C-Cl atoms is balanced by the dipole moment of the fourth $C-Cl$ bond dipole moment. This means the resultant of dipole moment of $ 3\ C-Cl$ bonds in tetrahedral structure is equal to $x$, which is equal and opposite to the dipole moment $x$ of the fourth $C-Cl$ bond.
Now, when we replace one of the chlorines with a hydrogen, the net dipole moment equals $x+y$, (as they are in the same directions). Similarly if we carry out the same procedure for $CH_3Cl$ it can be proved that its dipole moment is also $x+y$.

enter image description here
Where have I gone wrong?

Why does CH3Cl have a larger dipole moment than CHCl3?

Why does $\ce{CH3Cl}$, methyl chloride, have a larger dipole moment than $\ce{CHCl3}$, chloroform?

Let us consider $\ce{C-Cl}$ bond moment to be $x$ and that of $\ce{C-H}$ bond to be $y$.

In $\ce{CCl4}$, the dipole moment of any three $\ce{C-Cl}$ atoms is balanced by the dipole moment of the fourth $\ce{C-Cl}$ bond dipole moment. This means the resultant of dipole moment of three $\ce{C-Cl}$ bonds in tetrahedral structure is equal to $x$, which is equal and opposite to the dipole moment $x$ of the fourth $\ce{C-Cl}$ bond.

Now, when we replace one of the chlorines with a hydrogen, the net dipole moment equals $x+y$, (as they are in the same directions). Similarly if we carry out the same procedure for $\ce{CH3Cl}$ it can be proved that its dipole moment is also $x+y$.

enter image description here
Where have I gone wrong?

3 added 122 characters in body
source | link

Why does $CH_3Cl$ have more dipole moment than $CHCl_3$?

Let us consider $C-Cl$ bond moment to be $x$ and that of $C-H$ bond to be $y$.

In $CCl_4$, the dipole moment of any three C-Cl atoms is balanced by the dipole moment of the fourth $C-Cl$ bond dipole moment. This means the resultant of dipole moment of $ 3\ C-Cl$ bonds in tetrahedral structure is equal to $x$, which is equal and opposite to the dipole moment $x$ of the fourth $C-Cl$ bond.
Now, when we replace one of the chlorines with a hydrogen, the net dipole moment equals $x+y$, (as they are in the same directions). Similarly if we carry out the same procedure for $CH_3Cl$ it can be proved that its dipole moment is also $x+y$.

Where enter image description here
Where have I gone wrong?

Why does $CH_3Cl$ have more dipole moment than $CHCl_3$?

Let us consider $C-Cl$ bond moment to be $x$ and that of $C-H$ bond to be $y$.

In $CCl_4$, the dipole moment of any three C-Cl atoms is balanced by the dipole moment of the fourth $C-Cl$ bond dipole moment. This means the resultant of dipole moment of $ 3\ C-Cl$ bonds in tetrahedral structure is equal to $x$, which is equal and opposite to the dipole moment $x$ of the fourth $C-Cl$ bond.
Now, when we replace one of the chlorines with a hydrogen, the net dipole moment equals $x+y$, (as they are in the same directions). Similarly if we carry out the same procedure for $CH_3Cl$ it can be proved that its dipole moment is also $x+y$.

Where have I gone wrong?

Why does $CH_3Cl$ have more dipole moment than $CHCl_3$?

Let us consider $C-Cl$ bond moment to be $x$ and that of $C-H$ bond to be $y$.

In $CCl_4$, the dipole moment of any three C-Cl atoms is balanced by the dipole moment of the fourth $C-Cl$ bond dipole moment. This means the resultant of dipole moment of $ 3\ C-Cl$ bonds in tetrahedral structure is equal to $x$, which is equal and opposite to the dipole moment $x$ of the fourth $C-Cl$ bond.
Now, when we replace one of the chlorines with a hydrogen, the net dipole moment equals $x+y$, (as they are in the same directions). Similarly if we carry out the same procedure for $CH_3Cl$ it can be proved that its dipole moment is also $x+y$.

enter image description here
Where have I gone wrong?

2 added 80 characters in body
source | link
1
source | link