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Latin names are used to simplify identifying allergens.

The reason for this nomenclature is that it should be easy for everyone, wherever they are (even abroad), to identify substances they are allergic or otherwise sensitive to.

For water, this doesn'tmight not make much sense, but it does make a lot of sense for plants and chemicals, whose names vary widely between languages, so in this respect it's customer-friendly to have standardized terms for them.

The way by which this goal is achieved is by using the INCI nomenclature, as the other answers say. The downside of whichthis is that ingredients unwanted by some persons (e.g. non-vegan, or mineral oil based, ingredients etc.) can still be hidden with rather cryptic names, which can make those labels harder to read than if they were stated in the local language.

The reason is that it should be easy for everyone, wherever they are (even abroad), to identify substances they are allergic or otherwise sensitive to.

For water, this doesn't make much sense, but it does make a lot of sense for plants and chemicals, whose names vary widely between languages so in this respect it's customer-friendly to have standardized terms for them.

The way by which this goal is achieved is by using the INCI nomenclature, as the other answers say. The downside of which is that ingredients unwanted by some persons (e.g. non-vegan, or mineral oil based, etc.) can still be hidden with rather cryptic names which can make those labels harder to read than if they were stated in the local language.

Latin names are used to simplify identifying allergens.

The reason for this nomenclature is that it should be easy for everyone, wherever they are (even abroad), to identify substances they are allergic or otherwise sensitive to.

For water, this might not make much sense, but it does make a lot of sense for plants and chemicals, whose names vary widely between languages, so in this respect it's customer-friendly to have standardized terms for them.

The way by which this goal is achieved is by using the INCI nomenclature, as the other answers say. The downside of this is that ingredients unwanted by some persons (e.g. non-vegan or mineral oil based ingredients etc.) can still be hidden with rather cryptic names, which can make those labels harder to read than if they were stated in the local language.

2 added 348 characters in body
source | link

The reason is that it should be easy for everyone, wherever they are (even abroad), to identify substances they are allergic or otherwise sensitive to.

For water, this doesn't make much sense, but it does make a lot of sense for plants and chemicals, whose names vary widely between languages so in this respect it's customer-friendly to have standardized terms for them.

The way by which this goal is achieved is by using the INCI nomenclature, as the other answers say. The downside of which is that ingredients unwanted by some persons (e.g. non-vegan, or mineral oil based, etc.) can still be hidden with rather cryptic names which can make those labels harder to read than if they were stated in the local language.

The reason is that it should be easy for everyone, wherever they are (even abroad), to identify substances they are allergic or otherwise sensitive to.

For water, this doesn't make much sense, but it does make a lot of sense for plants and chemicals, whose names vary widely between languages so in this respect it's customer-friendly to have standardized terms for them.

The reason is that it should be easy for everyone, wherever they are (even abroad), to identify substances they are allergic or otherwise sensitive to.

For water, this doesn't make much sense, but it does make a lot of sense for plants and chemicals, whose names vary widely between languages so in this respect it's customer-friendly to have standardized terms for them.

The way by which this goal is achieved is by using the INCI nomenclature, as the other answers say. The downside of which is that ingredients unwanted by some persons (e.g. non-vegan, or mineral oil based, etc.) can still be hidden with rather cryptic names which can make those labels harder to read than if they were stated in the local language.

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source | link

The reason is that it should be easy for everyone, wherever they are (even abroad), to identify substances they are allergic or otherwise sensitive to.

For water, this doesn't make much sense, but it does make a lot of sense for plants and chemicals, whose names vary widely between languages so in this respect it's customer-friendly to have standardized terms for them.