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First, let's take a look at your proposed carbocation intermediate:

$$\ce{Ph-O-CH2-CH2+}$$

This is a primary carbocation, which makes it very unstable. It's unlikely to form, so the reaction can't involve going through this stage. Primary halides are much more likely to undergo $SN2$$\ce{S_N2}$ or $E2$$\ce{E2}$ reactions. Whether it's the former or the latter will depend on the nucleophilic and basic charachter of the other reagent. Bases (specially if sterically hindered) tend to favor $E2$$\ce{E2}$, while nucleophiles of low basicity tend to favor $SN2$$\ce{S_N2}$. However, many reagents may and will give a mix of both products.

With all this information, since $KOH$$\ce{KOH}$ is a very strong base and the reaction happens at high temperature, the result will be the $E2$$\ce{E2}$ product, in your second picture.

First, let's take a look at your proposed carbocation intermediate:

$$\ce{Ph-O-CH2-CH2+}$$

This is a primary carbocation, which makes it very unstable. It's unlikely to form, so the reaction can't involve going through this stage. Primary halides are much more likely to undergo $SN2$ or $E2$ reactions. Whether it's the former or the latter will depend on the nucleophilic and basic charachter of the other reagent. Bases (specially if sterically hindered) tend to favor $E2$, while nucleophiles of low basicity tend to favor $SN2$. However, many reagents may and will give a mix of both products.

With all this information, since $KOH$ is a very strong base and the reaction happens at high temperature, the result will be the $E2$ product, in your second picture.

First, let's take a look at your proposed carbocation intermediate:

$$\ce{Ph-O-CH2-CH2+}$$

This is a primary carbocation, which makes it very unstable. It's unlikely to form, so the reaction can't involve going through this stage. Primary halides are much more likely to undergo $\ce{S_N2}$ or $\ce{E2}$ reactions. Whether it's the former or the latter will depend on the nucleophilic and basic charachter of the other reagent. Bases (specially if sterically hindered) tend to favor $\ce{E2}$, while nucleophiles of low basicity tend to favor $\ce{S_N2}$. However, many reagents may and will give a mix of both products.

With all this information, since $\ce{KOH}$ is a very strong base and the reaction happens at high temperature, the result will be the $\ce{E2}$ product, in your second picture.

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First, let's take a look at your proposed carbocation intermediate:

$$\ce{Ph-O-CH2-CH2+}$$

This is a primary carbocation, which makes it very unstable. It's unlikely to form, so the reaction can't involve going through this stage. Primary halides are much more likely to undergo $SN2$ or $E2$ reactions. Whether it's the former or the latter will depend on the nucleophilic and basic charachter of the other reagent. Bases (specially if sterically hindered) tend to favor $E2$, while nucleophiles of low basicity tend to favor $SN2$. However, many reagents may and will give a mix of both products.

With all this information, since $KOH$ is a very strong base and the reaction happens at high temperature, the result will be the $E2$ product, in your second picture.