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Change in internal energy questionof a gas upon expansion against a constant external pressure

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I have a question about the following problem which I got wrong:

During expansion of its volume from 1.00 L$\mathrm{1.00\,L}$ to 10.00 L$\mathrm{10.00\,L}$ against a constant external pressure of 2.00 atm$\mathrm{2.00\,atm}$, a gas absorbs 200 J$\mathrm{200\,J}$ of energy as heat. Calculate the change in internal energy of the gas.

First, I used the equation: change in E = q + w$E = q + w$. I calculated work (-P * change in V$-P \Delta V$) and found it to be -18 (-2 * 10 - 1) $$-18 = -2 \cdot (10 - 1)$$. Then, I added -18 to q$-18 + q$, the heat absorbed (200 J$\mathrm{200\,J}$). This gave me a result of -182 J$\mathrm{-182\,J}$, which is wrong by a large factor. My textbook gives the answer of -1623 J$\mathrm{-1623\,J}$, but I am not sure where I am going wrong...

Do you know where I made a mistake? Thank you!

I have a question about the following problem which I got wrong:

During expansion of its volume from 1.00 L to 10.00 L against a constant external pressure of 2.00 atm, a gas absorbs 200 J of energy as heat. Calculate the change in internal energy of the gas.

First, I used the equation: change in E = q + w. I calculated work (-P * change in V) and found it to be -18 (-2 * 10 - 1). Then, I added -18 to q, the heat absorbed (200 J). This gave me a result of -182 J, which is wrong by a large factor. My textbook gives the answer of -1623 J, but I am not sure where I am going wrong...

Do you know where I made a mistake? Thank you!

I have a question about the following problem which I got wrong:

During expansion of its volume from $\mathrm{1.00\,L}$ to $\mathrm{10.00\,L}$ against a constant external pressure of $\mathrm{2.00\,atm}$, a gas absorbs $\mathrm{200\,J}$ of energy as heat. Calculate the change in internal energy of the gas.

First, I used the equation: change in $E = q + w$. I calculated work ($-P \Delta V$) and found it to be $$-18 = -2 \cdot (10 - 1)$$. Then, I added $-18 + q$, the heat absorbed ($\mathrm{200\,J}$). This gave me a result of $\mathrm{-182\,J}$, which is wrong by a large factor. My textbook gives the answer of $\mathrm{-1623\,J}$, but I am not sure where I am going wrong...

Do you know where I made a mistake? Thank you!

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Change in internal energy question

I have a question about the following problem which I got wrong:

During expansion of its volume from 1.00 L to 10.00 L against a constant external pressure of 2.00 atm, a gas absorbs 200 J of energy as heat. Calculate the change in internal energy of the gas.

First, I used the equation: change in E = q + w. I calculated work (-P * change in V) and found it to be -18 (-2 * 10 - 1). Then, I added -18 to q, the heat absorbed (200 J). This gave me a result of -182 J, which is wrong by a large factor. My textbook gives the answer of -1623 J, but I am not sure where I am going wrong...

Do you know where I made a mistake? Thank you!