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No, this is not possible.

Actually, if I would have to think of the most unlikely chemical conceivable, that would be it. Let's see why:

  1. Krypton is a noble gas that doesn't bond to anything. All of the known krypton compounds can be counted on one hand, and most of them contain fluorine. Putting krypton in a large molecule like this just can't be.

  2. This is the same for xenon. Even though it's slightly more reactive than krypton, it still has problems forming bonds with other stuff and even when it does it's extremely unstable.

  3. Gold is another noble element that doesn't like bonding to stuff.

  4. Permanaganate is a very strong oxidiser. This is not something you want to have around organic stuff (such as your oxalate). They are simply not stable together.

I don't know how you derived the data for it, but it seems completely unreasonable. A boiling point of 7538384392 K? How about no way? Even if you somehow could create this compound (god knows how), I would expect it to be so unstable it would decompose completely at ambient temperature. And by "ambient" I mean ambient on a Kuiper belt object.

No, this is not possible.

Actually, if I would have to think of the most unlikely chemical conceivable, that would be it. Let's see why:

  1. Krypton is a noble gas that doesn't bond to anything. All of the known krypton compounds can be counted on one hand, and most of them contain fluorine. Putting krypton in a large molecule like this just can't be.

  2. This is the same for xenon. Even though it's slightly more reactive than krypton, it still has problems forming bonds with other stuff and even when it does it's extremely unstable.

  3. Gold is another noble element that doesn't like bonding to stuff.

  4. Permanaganate is a very strong oxidiser. This is not something you want to have around organic stuff (such as your oxalate). They are simply not stable together.

I don't know how you derived the data for it, but it seems completely unreasonable. A boiling point of 7538384392 K? How about no way? Even if you somehow could create this compound (god knows how), I would expect it to be so unstable it would decompose completely at ambient temperature.

No, this is not possible.

Actually, if I would have to think of the most unlikely chemical conceivable, that would be it. Let's see why:

  1. Krypton is a noble gas that doesn't bond to anything. All of the known krypton compounds can be counted on one hand, and most of them contain fluorine. Putting krypton in a large molecule like this just can't be.

  2. This is the same for xenon. Even though it's slightly more reactive than krypton, it still has problems forming bonds with other stuff and even when it does it's extremely unstable.

  3. Gold is another noble element that doesn't like bonding to stuff.

  4. Permanaganate is a very strong oxidiser. This is not something you want to have around organic stuff (such as your oxalate). They are simply not stable together.

I don't know how you derived the data for it, but it seems completely unreasonable. A boiling point of 7538384392 K? How about no way? Even if you somehow could create this compound (god knows how), I would expect it to be so unstable it would decompose completely at ambient temperature. And by "ambient" I mean ambient on a Kuiper belt object.

1
source | link

No, this is not possible.

Actually, if I would have to think of the most unlikely chemical conceivable, that would be it. Let's see why:

  1. Krypton is a noble gas that doesn't bond to anything. All of the known krypton compounds can be counted on one hand, and most of them contain fluorine. Putting krypton in a large molecule like this just can't be.

  2. This is the same for xenon. Even though it's slightly more reactive than krypton, it still has problems forming bonds with other stuff and even when it does it's extremely unstable.

  3. Gold is another noble element that doesn't like bonding to stuff.

  4. Permanaganate is a very strong oxidiser. This is not something you want to have around organic stuff (such as your oxalate). They are simply not stable together.

I don't know how you derived the data for it, but it seems completely unreasonable. A boiling point of 7538384392 K? How about no way? Even if you somehow could create this compound (god knows how), I would expect it to be so unstable it would decompose completely at ambient temperature.