Post Closed as "unclear what you're asking" by Loong, Todd Minehardt, Ben Norris, Klaus-Dieter Warzecha, F'x
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Why during nuclear fissionfusion does the process only release neutrons?

Say we envision subatomic particles like balloons held together by static electricity (analogous to nuclear force). Now

Now we smash em' together. They make a new element. My chemistry test answer key has us calculate the number of neutrons that leave the reaction by using EinsteinsEinstein's famous equationsequation. But how do we know they were all neutrons that left? Couldn't some protons have been bounced off into the hinterlands, taking with them the energy their mass represents?

Why during nuclear fission does the process only release neutrons?

Say we envision subatomic particles like balloons held together by static electricity (analogous to nuclear force). Now we smash em' together. They make a new element. My chemistry test answer key has us calculate the number of neutrons that leave the reaction by using Einsteins famous equations. But how do we know they were all neutrons that left? Couldn't some protons have been bounced off into the hinterlands, taking with them the energy their mass represents?

Why during nuclear fusion does the process only release neutrons?

Say we envision subatomic particles like balloons held together by static electricity (analogous to nuclear force).

Now we smash em' together. They make a new element. My chemistry test answer key has us calculate the number of neutrons that leave the reaction by using Einstein's famous equation. But how do we know they were all neutrons that left? Couldn't some protons have been bounced off into the hinterlands, taking with them the energy their mass represents?

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source | link

Why during nuclear fission does the process only release neutrons?

Say we envision subatomic particles like balloons held together by static electricity (analogous to nuclear force). Now we smash em' together. They make a new element. My chemistry test answer key has us calculate the number of neutrons that leave the reaction by using Einsteins famous equations. But how do we know they were all neutrons that left? Couldn't some protons have been bounced off into the hinterlands, taking with them the energy their mass represents?