4 had the obsolete homework tag; fixed tags, anionized -> double anion
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Why does oxygen not like to be doubly anionizeda double anion?

The electron affinity of a neutral oxygen atom is −142 kJ (it releases this energy). The electron affinity for the now anionized oxygendouble anion $\ce{O^2-}$ is 710 kJ (work must be done on the atom).

My question is, why the large jump in electron affinity? We are taught that the electrons do not interact much with each other in the way of shielding. I think this to be incorrect, because otherwise, the effective nuclear charge on all of the valence electrons should be about the same, including the new ones added to ionize the atom. This would make the electron affinity about the same for each electron. Plus, doesn’t the oxygen atom want to complete its shell? So why is it putting up a fight?

Why does oxygen not like to be doubly anionized?

The electron affinity of a neutral oxygen atom is −142 kJ (it releases this energy). The electron affinity for the now anionized oxygen is 710 kJ (work must be done on the atom).

My question is, why the large jump in electron affinity? We are taught that the electrons do not interact much with each other in the way of shielding. I think this to be incorrect, because otherwise, the effective nuclear charge on all of the valence electrons should be about the same, including the new ones added to ionize the atom. This would make the electron affinity about the same for each electron. Plus, doesn’t the oxygen atom want to complete its shell? So why is it putting up a fight?

Why does oxygen not like to be a double anion?

The electron affinity of a neutral oxygen atom is −142 kJ (it releases this energy). The electron affinity for the now double anion $\ce{O^2-}$ is 710 kJ (work must be done on the atom).

My question is, why the large jump in electron affinity? We are taught that the electrons do not interact much with each other in the way of shielding. I think this to be incorrect, because otherwise, the effective nuclear charge on all of the valence electrons should be about the same, including the new ones added to ionize the atom. This would make the electron affinity about the same for each electron. Plus, doesn’t the oxygen atom want to complete its shell? So why is it putting up a fight?

3 deleted 2 characters in body; edited title
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Why does Oxygenoxygen not like to be doubly Anionizedanionized?

The Electron Affinityelectron affinity of a neutral Oxygenoxygen atom is -142 KJ−142 kJ (it releases this energy). The Electron Affinityelectron affinity for the now anionized Oxygenoxygen is 710 KJ kJ (Workwork must be done on the atom).  

My question is, why the large jump in Electronelectron affinity? We are taught that the electrons do not interact much with each other in the way of shielding. I think this to be incorrect, because otherwise, the Effective Nuclear Chargeeffective nuclear charge on all of the Valencevalence electrons should be about the same, including the new ones added to ionize the atom. This would make the Electron Affinityelectron affinity about the same for each electron. Plus, doesn'tdoesn’t the Oxygenoxygen atom want to complete its Shellshell? soSo why is it putting up a fight?  

Why does Oxygen not like to be doubly Anionized?

The Electron Affinity of a neutral Oxygen atom is -142 KJ (it releases this energy). The Electron Affinity for the now anionized Oxygen is 710 KJ (Work must be done on the atom).  

My question is, why the large jump in Electron affinity? We are taught that the electrons do not interact much with each other in the way of shielding. I think this to be incorrect, because otherwise, the Effective Nuclear Charge on all of the Valence electrons should be about the same, including the new ones added to ionize the atom. This would make the Electron Affinity about the same for each electron. Plus, doesn't the Oxygen atom want to complete its Shell? so why is it putting up a fight?  

Why does oxygen not like to be doubly anionized?

The electron affinity of a neutral oxygen atom is −142 kJ (it releases this energy). The electron affinity for the now anionized oxygen is 710 kJ (work must be done on the atom).

My question is, why the large jump in electron affinity? We are taught that the electrons do not interact much with each other in the way of shielding. I think this to be incorrect, because otherwise, the effective nuclear charge on all of the valence electrons should be about the same, including the new ones added to ionize the atom. This would make the electron affinity about the same for each electron. Plus, doesn’t the oxygen atom want to complete its shell? So why is it putting up a fight?

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2 Improper definition
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The Electron Affinity of a neutral Oxygen atom is -142 KJ (it releases this energy). The Electron Affinity for the now anionized Oxygen is 710 KJ (Work must be done on the atom).

My question is, why the large jump in Electron affinity? We are taught that the electrons do not interact much with each other in the way of shielding. I think this to be incorrect, because otherwise, the Effective Nuclear Charge on all of the Valence electrons should be about the same, including the new ones added to ionize the atom. This would make the ionization energyElectron Affinity about the same for each electron. Plus, doesn't the Oxygen atom want to complete its Shell? so why is it putting up a fight?

The Electron Affinity of a neutral Oxygen atom is -142 KJ (it releases this energy). The Electron Affinity for the now anionized Oxygen is 710 KJ (Work must be done on the atom).

My question is, why the large jump in Electron affinity? We are taught that the electrons do not interact much with each other in the way of shielding. I think this to be incorrect, because otherwise, the Effective Nuclear Charge on all of the Valence electrons should be about the same, including the new ones added to ionize the atom. This would make the ionization energy about the same for each electron. Plus, doesn't the Oxygen atom want to complete its Shell? so why is it putting up a fight?

The Electron Affinity of a neutral Oxygen atom is -142 KJ (it releases this energy). The Electron Affinity for the now anionized Oxygen is 710 KJ (Work must be done on the atom).

My question is, why the large jump in Electron affinity? We are taught that the electrons do not interact much with each other in the way of shielding. I think this to be incorrect, because otherwise, the Effective Nuclear Charge on all of the Valence electrons should be about the same, including the new ones added to ionize the atom. This would make the Electron Affinity about the same for each electron. Plus, doesn't the Oxygen atom want to complete its Shell? so why is it putting up a fight?

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