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Question Regarding Do volumes and pressures calculated from Boyle's Law depend on the temperature?

As the title suggests, i have a question regarding Boyle's law.

As Boyle's law states that "The volume(V) $V$ of a given mass of a gas, is inversely proportional to the pressure(P) $p$ applied to it when the temperature $T$ is constant."

So if we had a gas at say a pressure P-one$p_1$, and a volume V-one$V_1$, corresponding to this pressure at a constant temperature T-one$T_1$. 

Now if i were to increase the the temperature of this gas to a new temperature T-two$T_2$ and make it constant. And then apply the same pressure P-one$p_1$ on the gas would the volume still be V-one$V_1$?

Considering the fact that volume and pressure are inversely proportional for a constant temperature, and hence they dont depend on the temperature?? Am i right?

Thanks

Question Regarding Boyle's Law

As the title suggests, i have a question regarding Boyle's law.

As Boyle's law states that "The volume(V) of a given mass of a gas, is inversely proportional to the pressure(P) applied to it when the temperature is constant."

So if we had a gas at say a pressure P-one, and a volume V-one, corresponding to this pressure at a constant temperature T-one. Now if i were to increase the the temperature of this gas to a new temperature T-two and make it constant. And then apply the same pressure P-one on the gas would the volume still be V-one?

Considering the fact that volume and pressure are inversely proportional for a constant temperature, and hence they dont depend on the temperature?? Am i right?

Thanks

Do volumes and pressures calculated from Boyle's Law depend on the temperature?

As the title suggests, i have a question regarding Boyle's law.

As Boyle's law states that "The volume $V$ of a given mass of a gas, is inversely proportional to the pressure $p$ applied to it when the temperature $T$ is constant."

So if we had a gas at say a pressure $p_1$, and a volume $V_1$, corresponding to this pressure at a constant temperature $T_1$. 

Now if i were to increase the the temperature of this gas to a new temperature $T_2$ and make it constant. And then apply the same pressure $p_1$ on the gas would the volume still be $V_1$?

Considering the fact that volume and pressure are inversely proportional for a constant temperature, and hence they dont depend on the temperature?? Am i right?

Thanks

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Batwayne
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Question Regarding Boyle's Law

As the title suggests, i have a question regarding Boyle's law.

As Boyle's law states that "The volume(V) of a given mass of a gas, is inversely proportional to the pressure(P) applied to it when the temperature is constant."

So if we had a gas at say a pressure P-one, and a volume V-one, corresponding to this pressure at a constant temperature T-one. Now if i were to increase the the temperature of this gas to a new temperature T-two and make it constant. And then apply the same pressure P-one on the gas would the volume still be V-one?

Considering the fact that volume and pressure are inversely proportional for a constant temperature, and hence they dont depend on the temperature?? Am i right?

Thanks