2 fix spelling
source | link

Unlike some, I wouldn't bet this is not common. Let's take a look at the biggest body in our system: the Sun. In it'sits center, you can find for example some fluorine which is completely ionized. That's not really what we are used to with this electron lover.

We can also look for example at Titan's upper atmosphere. Here, interactions with the magnetic field of Saturn are responsible for the formation of species like $\mathrm O^+$, or almost every ionized molecule you can imagine with $\mathrm C$, $\mathrm N$, $\mathrm O$ and $\mathrm H$.

There are exampleexamples like thisthese everywhere just in our Solar system.

Most of chemistry class seemsclasses seem to forget that our "standard room conditions" are far from being a standard in the whole universe. That's a shame because most of the "rules" we learn in high school (and some colleges) are based on the assumption that we are at those said standard conditions and stash the fact that the observed chemical behavior of elements is not necessarily even representative of what happen when you look at the whole universe.

Unlike some, I wouldn't bet this is not common. Let's take a look at the biggest body in our system: the Sun. In it's center, you can find for example some fluorine which is completely ionized. That's not really what we are used to with this electron lover.

We can also look for example at Titan's upper atmosphere. Here, interactions with the magnetic field of Saturn are responsible for the formation of species like $\mathrm O^+$, or almost every ionized molecule you can imagine with $\mathrm C$, $\mathrm N$, $\mathrm O$ and $\mathrm H$.

There are example like this everywhere just in our Solar system.

Most of chemistry class seems to forget that our "standard room conditions" are far from being a standard in the whole universe. That's a shame because most of the "rules" we learn in high school (and some colleges) are based on the assumption that we are at those said standard conditions and stash the fact that the observed chemical behavior of elements is not necessarily even representative of what happen when you look at the whole universe.

Unlike some, I wouldn't bet this is not common. Let's take a look at the biggest body in our system: the Sun. In its center, you can find for example some fluorine which is completely ionized. That's not really what we are used to with this electron lover.

We can also look for example at Titan's upper atmosphere. Here, interactions with the magnetic field of Saturn are responsible for the formation of species like $\mathrm O^+$, or almost every ionized molecule you can imagine with $\mathrm C$, $\mathrm N$, $\mathrm O$ and $\mathrm H$.

There are examples like these everywhere just in our Solar system.

Most chemistry classes seem to forget that our "standard room conditions" are far from being a standard in the whole universe. That's a shame because most of the "rules" we learn in high school (and some colleges) are based on the assumption that we are at those said standard conditions and stash the fact that the observed chemical behavior of elements is not necessarily even representative of what happen when you look at the whole universe.

1
source | link

Unlike some, I wouldn't bet this is not common. Let's take a look at the biggest body in our system: the Sun. In it's center, you can find for example some fluorine which is completely ionized. That's not really what we are used to with this electron lover.

We can also look for example at Titan's upper atmosphere. Here, interactions with the magnetic field of Saturn are responsible for the formation of species like $\mathrm O^+$, or almost every ionized molecule you can imagine with $\mathrm C$, $\mathrm N$, $\mathrm O$ and $\mathrm H$.

There are example like this everywhere just in our Solar system.

Most of chemistry class seems to forget that our "standard room conditions" are far from being a standard in the whole universe. That's a shame because most of the "rules" we learn in high school (and some colleges) are based on the assumption that we are at those said standard conditions and stash the fact that the observed chemical behavior of elements is not necessarily even representative of what happen when you look at the whole universe.