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It seems like the typical laboratory methods for determining the carbon content of steel are to cuppellate it in a stream of oxygen and then measure the volume of the evolved CO$\ce{CO}$ and CO2$\ce{CO2}$, which involves many high-temperature complexities.

Why can't the carbon content of steel be measured by dissolving it in acid and reacting out the carbon at low temperature?

It seems like the typical laboratory methods for determining the carbon content of steel are to cuppellate it in a stream of oxygen and then measure the volume of the evolved CO and CO2, which involves many high-temperature complexities.

Why can't the carbon content of steel be measured by dissolving it in acid and reacting out the carbon at low temperature?

It seems like the typical laboratory methods for determining the carbon content of steel are to cuppellate it in a stream of oxygen and then measure the volume of the evolved $\ce{CO}$ and $\ce{CO2}$, which involves many high-temperature complexities.

Why can't the carbon content of steel be measured by dissolving it in acid and reacting out the carbon at low temperature?

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Determination of carbon content of steel by liquid chemistry

It seems like the typical laboratory methods for determining the carbon content of steel are to cuppellate it in a stream of oxygen and then measure the volume of the evolved CO and CO2, which involves many high-temperature complexities.

Why can't the carbon content of steel be measured by dissolving it in acid and reacting out the carbon at low temperature?