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To let you know where I'm coming from: I haven't studied chemistry since high school. I am now studying something else, but I have a dataset coming from your field and I would like some help in understanding just the very very basics of what it is.

What I have is NOx$\ce{NOx}$, nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide in an engine exhaust and the equivalence ratio. It's from the dataset ethanol in the package SemiPar in R, and the original reference is Brinkman (1981). You'll find a figure at the bottom.

What I want: I want to be able to, extremely briefly, explain what this is describing.

My understanding of the equivalence ratio is that if it is below 1, then there is too little air (compared to the stoichometric mix). If it is above 1, that means that there is too much fuel, and not all of it can be used leading to what is called incomplete combustion.

Is this correct? Would you be able to provide a better explanation? Imagine you're trying to explain it to a five-year-old, that's about how much of this I know!

If you've read this far, please also help me with appropriate tags for the question. I'm not sure what to choose.


Reference:

Brinkman, N.D. (1981). Ethanol fuel – a single-cylinder engine study of efficiency and exhaust emissions. SAE transactions Vol. 90, No 810345, 1410–1424. enter image description here

To let you know where I'm coming from: I haven't studied chemistry since high school. I am now studying something else, but I have a dataset coming from your field and I would like some help in understanding just the very very basics of what it is.

What I have is NOx, nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide in an engine exhaust and the equivalence ratio. It's from the dataset ethanol in the package SemiPar in R, and the original reference is Brinkman (1981). You'll find a figure at the bottom.

What I want: I want to be able to, extremely briefly, explain what this is describing.

My understanding of the equivalence ratio is that if it is below 1, then there is too little air (compared to the stoichometric mix). If it is above 1, that means that there is too much fuel, and not all of it can be used leading to what is called incomplete combustion.

Is this correct? Would you be able to provide a better explanation? Imagine you're trying to explain it to a five-year-old, that's about how much of this I know!

If you've read this far, please also help me with appropriate tags for the question. I'm not sure what to choose.


Reference:

Brinkman, N.D. (1981). Ethanol fuel – a single-cylinder engine study of efficiency and exhaust emissions. SAE transactions Vol. 90, No 810345, 1410–1424. enter image description here

To let you know where I'm coming from: I haven't studied chemistry since high school. I am now studying something else, but I have a dataset coming from your field and I would like some help in understanding just the very very basics of what it is.

What I have is $\ce{NOx}$, nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide in an engine exhaust and the equivalence ratio. It's from the dataset ethanol in the package SemiPar in R, and the original reference is Brinkman (1981). You'll find a figure at the bottom.

What I want: I want to be able to, extremely briefly, explain what this is describing.

My understanding of the equivalence ratio is that if it is below 1, then there is too little air (compared to the stoichometric mix). If it is above 1, that means that there is too much fuel, and not all of it can be used leading to what is called incomplete combustion.

Is this correct? Would you be able to provide a better explanation? Imagine you're trying to explain it to a five-year-old, that's about how much of this I know!

If you've read this far, please also help me with appropriate tags for the question. I'm not sure what to choose.


Reference:

Brinkman, N.D. (1981). Ethanol fuel – a single-cylinder engine study of efficiency and exhaust emissions. SAE transactions Vol. 90, No 810345, 1410–1424. enter image description here

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Equivalence ratio explained

To let you know where I'm coming from: I haven't studied chemistry since high school. I am now studying something else, but I have a dataset coming from your field and I would like some help in understanding just the very very basics of what it is.

What I have is NOx, nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide in an engine exhaust and the equivalence ratio. It's from the dataset ethanol in the package SemiPar in R, and the original reference is Brinkman (1981). You'll find a figure at the bottom.

What I want: I want to be able to, extremely briefly, explain what this is describing.

My understanding of the equivalence ratio is that if it is below 1, then there is too little air (compared to the stoichometric mix). If it is above 1, that means that there is too much fuel, and not all of it can be used leading to what is called incomplete combustion.

Is this correct? Would you be able to provide a better explanation? Imagine you're trying to explain it to a five-year-old, that's about how much of this I know!

If you've read this far, please also help me with appropriate tags for the question. I'm not sure what to choose.


Reference:

Brinkman, N.D. (1981). Ethanol fuel – a single-cylinder engine study of efficiency and exhaust emissions. SAE transactions Vol. 90, No 810345, 1410–1424. enter image description here