4 use markdown instead of markup, improve whitespace, make complete sentence
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AnThis is an old question that our textbook tried to answer but worsened the situation.
Many

Many things are soluble in water. So many, that studying solutions will always require studying aqueous ones. It is true that many non-polars like waxes are not very soluble in water, yet I have nevernever run into a solvent as "good" as water. 

But how were we answered when we asked that "why is water a good solvent"? They said since water is polar so the attraction between for example $\ce{O}$ and the positive ions is so much blah blah blah!
So

So either there are "great" solvents like water out there or there are other things about water that make it the master solvent that are beyond me.

  • Is there a solvent as "versatile" as water?
     
  • Can this kind of solvent be non-polar?
     
  • If the answer to the questions above is no, what is special about water?

An old question that our textbook tried to answer but worsened the situation.
Many things are soluble in water. So many, that studying solutions will always require studying aqueous ones. It is true that many non-polars like waxes are not very soluble in water, yet I have never run into a solvent as "good" as water. But how were we answered when we asked that "why is water a good solvent"? They said since water is polar so the attraction between for example $\ce{O}$ and the positive ions is so much blah blah blah!
So either there are "great" solvents like water out there or there are other things about water that make it the master solvent that are beyond me.

  • Is there a solvent as "versatile" as water?
     
  • Can this kind of solvent be non-polar?
     
  • If the answer to the questions above is no, what is special about water?

This is an old question that our textbook tried to answer but worsened the situation.

Many things are soluble in water. So many, that studying solutions will always require studying aqueous ones. It is true that many non-polars like waxes are not very soluble in water, yet I have never run into a solvent as "good" as water. 

But how were we answered when we asked that "why is water a good solvent"? They said since water is polar so the attraction between for example $\ce{O}$ and the positive ions is so much blah blah blah!

So either there are "great" solvents like water out there or there are other things about water that make it the master solvent that are beyond me.

  • Is there a solvent as "versatile" as water?
  • Can this kind of solvent be non-polar?
  • If the answer to the questions above is no, what is special about water?
3 deleted 5 characters in body
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An old question that our textbook tried to answer but worsened the situation.
Many things are soluble in water. So many, that studying solutions will always require studying aqueous ones. It is true that many non-polars like waxes are not very soluble in water, yet I have never run into a solvent as "good" as water. But how were we answered when we asked that "why is water a good solvent"? They said since water is polar so the attraction between for example $\ce{O}$ and the positive ions is so much blah blah blah!
So either there are "great" solvents like water out there or there are other things about water that make it the master solvent that are beyond me.
- Is there a solvent as "versatile" as water?
- Can this kind of solvent be non-polar?
- If the answer to the questions above is no, what is special about water?

  • Is there a solvent as "versatile" as water?
  • Can this kind of solvent be non-polar?
  • If the answer to the questions above is no, what is special about water?

An old question that our textbook tried to answer but worsened the situation.
Many things are soluble in water. So many, that studying solutions will always require studying aqueous ones. It is true that many non-polars like waxes are not very soluble in water, yet I have never run into a solvent as "good" as water. But how were we answered when we asked that "why is water a good solvent"? They said since water is polar so the attraction between for example $\ce{O}$ and the positive ions is so much blah blah blah!
So either there are "great" solvents like water out there or there are other things about water that make it the master solvent that are beyond me.
- Is there a solvent as "versatile" as water?
- Can this kind of solvent be non-polar?
- If the answer to the questions above is no, what is special about water?

An old question that our textbook tried to answer but worsened the situation.
Many things are soluble in water. So many, that studying solutions will always require studying aqueous ones. It is true that many non-polars like waxes are not very soluble in water, yet I have never run into a solvent as "good" as water. But how were we answered when we asked that "why is water a good solvent"? They said since water is polar so the attraction between for example $\ce{O}$ and the positive ions is so much blah blah blah!
So either there are "great" solvents like water out there or there are other things about water that make it the master solvent that are beyond me.

  • Is there a solvent as "versatile" as water?
  • Can this kind of solvent be non-polar?
  • If the answer to the questions above is no, what is special about water?
2 added 9 characters in body; edited title
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Why is water "THE UNIVERSAL""the universal" solvent?

An old question that our textbook tried to answer but worsened the situation.
Many things are soluble in water. So many, that studying solutions will always require studying aqueous ones. It is true that many non-polars like waxes are not very soluble in water, yet I have never run into a solvent as "good" as water. But how were we answered when we asked that "why is water a good solvent"? They said since water is polar so the attraction between for example O$\ce{O}$ and the positive ions is so much blah blah blah!
So either there are "great" solvents like water out there or there are other things about water that make it the master solvent that are beyond me. 
- Is there a solvent as "versatile" as water?
- Can this kind of solvent be non-polar?
- If the answer to the questions above is no, what is special about water?

Why is water "THE UNIVERSAL" solvent?

An old question that our textbook tried to answer but worsened the situation.
Many things are soluble in water. So many, that studying solutions will always require studying aqueous ones. It is true that many non-polars like waxes are not very soluble in water, yet I have never run into a solvent as "good" as water. But how were we answered when we asked that "why is water a good solvent"? They said since water is polar so the attraction between for example O and the positive ions is so much blah blah blah!
So either there are "great" solvents like water out there or there are other things about water that make it the master solvent that are beyond me.
- Is there a solvent as "versatile" as water?
- Can this kind of solvent be non-polar?
- If the answer to the questions above is no, what is special about water?

Why is water "the universal" solvent?

An old question that our textbook tried to answer but worsened the situation.
Many things are soluble in water. So many, that studying solutions will always require studying aqueous ones. It is true that many non-polars like waxes are not very soluble in water, yet I have never run into a solvent as "good" as water. But how were we answered when we asked that "why is water a good solvent"? They said since water is polar so the attraction between for example $\ce{O}$ and the positive ions is so much blah blah blah!
So either there are "great" solvents like water out there or there are other things about water that make it the master solvent that are beyond me. 
- Is there a solvent as "versatile" as water?
- Can this kind of solvent be non-polar?
- If the answer to the questions above is no, what is special about water?

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