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Do the π-electrons from the oxygen atomC=O bond in tropone contribute to Hückel 's rule?

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Extended conjugation Do the π-electrons from the oxygen atom in cyclic ketonetropone contribute to Hückel 's rule?

This is a continuation of Is tropone aromatic?Is tropone aromatic?

So,Resonance forms of tropone

I'm looking at the moleculeresonance form that does have the carbonyl double-bond, 1a. IsCan this resonance structure also be considered aromatic? Would the electrons from the carbonyl oxygenC=O double bond also be delocalized through extended conjugation?

To me, this looks like a very similar situation to the double bond conjugationstyrene, when we have an alkenyl sidechain attached to a benzene ring. Would this interfere with Huckel's number?

Apparently, for alkenyl side-chains, Huckel's number is not affected, leaving an already aromatic compound to stay aromatic even though more electrons come into the conjugation. How is that also possible

In the case of tropone, would the C=O double bond interfere with electron counting for Hückel's rule?

Extended conjugation in cyclic ketone

This is a continuation of Is tropone aromatic?

So, I'm looking at the molecule that does have the carbonyl double-bond. Is this resonance structure considered aromatic? Would the electrons from the carbonyl oxygen also be delocalized through extended conjugation?

To me, this looks very similar to the double bond conjugation, when we have an alkenyl sidechain attached to a benzene ring. Would this interfere with Huckel's number?

Apparently, for alkenyl side-chains, Huckel's number is not affected, leaving an already aromatic compound to stay aromatic even though more electrons come into the conjugation. How is that also possible?

Do the π-electrons from the oxygen atom in tropone contribute to Hückel 's rule?

This is a continuation of Is tropone aromatic?

Resonance forms of tropone

I'm looking at the resonance form that does have the carbonyl double-bond, 1a. Can this resonance structure also be considered aromatic? Would the electrons from the C=O double bond also be delocalized through extended conjugation?

To me, this looks like a very similar situation to styrene, when we have an alkenyl sidechain attached to a benzene ring. Apparently, for alkenyl side-chains, Huckel's number is not affected, leaving an already aromatic compound to stay aromatic even though more electrons come into the conjugation.

In the case of tropone, would the C=O double bond interfere with electron counting for Hückel's rule?

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This is a continuation of http://chemistry.stackexchange.com/questions/15272/aromaticity-of-cyclic-ketoneIs tropone aromatic?

So, I'm looking at the molecule that does have the carbonyl double-bond. Is this resonance structure considered aromatic? Would the electrons from the carbonyl oxygen also be delocalized through extended conjugation?

To me, this looks very similar to the double bond conjugation, when we have an alkenyl sidechain attached to a benzene ring. Would this interfere with Huckel's number?

Apparently, for alkenyl side-chains, Huckel's number is not affected, leaving an already aromatic compound to stay aromatic even though more electrons come into the conjugation. How is that also possible?

This is a continuation of http://chemistry.stackexchange.com/questions/15272/aromaticity-of-cyclic-ketone

So, I'm looking at the molecule that does have the carbonyl double-bond. Is this resonance structure considered aromatic? Would the electrons from the carbonyl oxygen also be delocalized through extended conjugation?

To me, this looks very similar to the double bond conjugation, when we have an alkenyl sidechain attached to a benzene ring. Would this interfere with Huckel's number?

Apparently, for alkenyl side-chains, Huckel's number is not affected, leaving an already aromatic compound to stay aromatic even though more electrons come into the conjugation. How is that also possible?

This is a continuation of Is tropone aromatic?

So, I'm looking at the molecule that does have the carbonyl double-bond. Is this resonance structure considered aromatic? Would the electrons from the carbonyl oxygen also be delocalized through extended conjugation?

To me, this looks very similar to the double bond conjugation, when we have an alkenyl sidechain attached to a benzene ring. Would this interfere with Huckel's number?

Apparently, for alkenyl side-chains, Huckel's number is not affected, leaving an already aromatic compound to stay aromatic even though more electrons come into the conjugation. How is that also possible?

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