5 formatting and grammer
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In the following ASCI structure (single bond under "CH""$\ce{CH}$" containing CH2,CH2, CH3$\ce{CH2,CH2, CH3}$)

$$\ce{CH3-CH2-CH2-CH-CH3}$$

$$\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;|$$ $$\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\ce{CH2-CH2-CH3}$$$$ \begin{align*} \ce{CH3-CH2-CH2-&CH-CH3}\\ &|\\ \ce{&CH2-CH2-CH3} \end{align*} $$

The correct way to name it is "4-methlyheptane".

But when I do it the way I have been taught I get the following "4-propylpentane"

Here. Here are my systematic steps:

1) Firstly, I count the longest carbon chain..in In this case its 5 carbons together so suffix -pentane

then. Then I look to see if there are any branched chains and number it from left to right.

  In this case the branched chain is on number 4.

  The branched chain contains CH2-CH2-CH3 --> C3H7$\ce{CH2-CH2-CH3}$, resp. $\ce{C3H7}$, aka proplypropyl.

ergoErgo, 4-propylpentane -, however, the correct answer as mentioned above is 4-methylheptane.

How is it 'heptane' ? The longest chain has FIVE carbons. I got the '4-' part correct, but how is CH2-CH2-CH3$\ce{CH2-CH2-CH3}$ Methyl?? Is this a mistake in my book?

In the following ASCI structure (single bond under "CH" containing CH2,CH2, CH3)

$$\ce{CH3-CH2-CH2-CH-CH3}$$

$$\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;|$$ $$\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\;\ce{CH2-CH2-CH3}$$

The correct way to name it is "4-methlyheptane"

But when I do it the way I have been taught I get the following "4-propylpentane"

Here are my systematic steps:

1) Firstly, I count the longest carbon chain..in this case its 5 carbons together so suffix -pentane

then I look to see if there are any branched chains and number it from left to right.

  In this case the branched chain is on number 4.

  The branched chain contains CH2-CH2-CH3 --> C3H7 aka proply

ergo, 4-propylpentane - however the correct answer as mentioned above is 4-methylheptane.

How is it 'heptane' ? The longest chain has FIVE carbons. I got the '4-' part correct, but how is CH2-CH2-CH3 Methyl?? Is this a mistake in my book?

In the following ASCI structure (single bond under "$\ce{CH}$" containing $\ce{CH2,CH2, CH3}$)

$$ \begin{align*} \ce{CH3-CH2-CH2-&CH-CH3}\\ &|\\ \ce{&CH2-CH2-CH3} \end{align*} $$

The correct way to name it is "4-methlyheptane".

But when I do it the way I have been taught I get the following "4-propylpentane". Here are my systematic steps:

Firstly, I count the longest carbon chain. In this case its 5 carbons together so suffix -pentane. Then I look to see if there are any branched chains and number it from left to right. In this case the branched chain is on number 4. The branched chain contains $\ce{CH2-CH2-CH3}$, resp. $\ce{C3H7}$, aka propyl.

Ergo, 4-propylpentane, however, the correct answer as mentioned above is 4-methylheptane.

How is it 'heptane' ? The longest chain has FIVE carbons. I got the '4-' part correct, but how is $\ce{CH2-CH2-CH3}$ Methyl? Is this a mistake in my book?

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Naming structural formula help (possible mistake in my textbook) Why doesn't this structure represent a substituted pentane?

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