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The unprotonated amino group ($\ce{R-NH2}$) does not protonate $\ce{OH-}$ because it is an extremely weak acid. Primary and secondary amines have a $pK_a$$pK_a$ of around 35, while the $pK_a$ of hydroxide is about 13-14 in aqueous solution. Deprotonating $\ce{NH2}$ groups requires much stronger bases in non-aqueous medium. Therefore, the carboxylic acid group of the amino acid is deprotonated in aqueous alkaline solution, as shown in the scheme from your textbook.

The unprotonated amino group ($\ce{R-NH2}$) does not protonate $\ce{OH-}$ because it is an extremely weak acid. Primary and secondary amines have a $pK_a$ of around 35, while the $pK_a$ of hydroxide is about 13-14 in aqueous solution. Deprotonating $\ce{NH2}$ groups requires much stronger bases in non-aqueous medium. Therefore, the carboxylic acid group of the amino acid is deprotonated in aqueous alkaline solution, as shown in the scheme from your textbook.

The unprotonated amino group ($\ce{R-NH2}$) does not protonate $\ce{OH-}$ because it is an extremely weak acid. Primary and secondary amines have a $pK_a$ of around 35, while the $pK_a$ of hydroxide is about 13-14 in aqueous solution. Deprotonating $\ce{NH2}$ groups requires much stronger bases in non-aqueous medium. Therefore, the carboxylic acid group of the amino acid is deprotonated in aqueous alkaline solution, as shown in the scheme from your textbook.

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The unprotonated amino group ($\ce{R-NH2}$) does not protonate $\ce{OH-}$ because it is an extremely weak acid. Primary and secondary amines have a $pK_a$ of around 35, while the $pK_a$ of hydroxide is about 13-14 in aqueous solution. Deprotonating $\ce{NH2}$ groups requires much stronger bases in non-aqueous medium. Therefore, the carboxylic acid group of the amino acid is deprotonated in aqueous alkaline solution, as shown in the scheme from your textbook.