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There are two very strong reasons, legal and marketing.

The way that Coca Cola is created is a trade secret. It is not patented, the company just keeps it secret. As long as it is secret, other companies are free to create their own recipes, even their own, identical recipes, but it is illegal to create such a recipe by breaking into some office and stealing the original recipe, or by analysing the original drink. If you reverse engineered the recipe, you could expect to be taken to court. And your engineers would have to appear as witness and have the choice of saying the truth or turning themselves into criminals by lying. Not a good business strategy.

The other problem is that a company like Pepsi doesn't want to create something that tastes exactly like Coca Cola. Their customers buy their drinks because they prefer the different taste. If Pepsi changed their taste to be exactly like Coca Cola, they would just annoy their own customers.

Just to make this clear: Reverse engineering in itself is possibly not illegal. Discovering a trade secret by reverse engineering and then using the reverse engineered recipe to make your own product is most likely illegal. Creating the impression that you discovered a trade secret by reverse engineering and then used it to create your own product will get you sued, which will cost you more money than it is worth.

There are two very strong reasons, legal and marketing.

The way that Coca Cola is created is a trade secret. It is not patented, the company just keeps it secret. As long as it is secret, other companies are free to create their own recipes, even their own, identical recipes, but it is illegal to create such a recipe by breaking into some office and stealing the original recipe, or by analysing the original drink. If you reverse engineered the recipe, you could expect to be taken to court. And your engineers would have to appear as witness and have the choice of saying the truth or turning themselves into criminals by lying. Not a good business strategy.

The other problem is that a company like Pepsi doesn't want to create something that tastes exactly like Coca Cola. Their customers buy their drinks because they prefer the different taste. If Pepsi changed their taste to be exactly like Coca Cola, they would just annoy their own customers.

There are two very strong reasons, legal and marketing.

The way that Coca Cola is created is a trade secret. It is not patented, the company just keeps it secret. As long as it is secret, other companies are free to create their own recipes, even their own, identical recipes, but it is illegal to create such a recipe by breaking into some office and stealing the original recipe, or by analysing the original drink. If you reverse engineered the recipe, you could expect to be taken to court. And your engineers would have to appear as witness and have the choice of saying the truth or turning themselves into criminals by lying. Not a good business strategy.

The other problem is that a company like Pepsi doesn't want to create something that tastes exactly like Coca Cola. Their customers buy their drinks because they prefer the different taste. If Pepsi changed their taste to be exactly like Coca Cola, they would just annoy their own customers.

Just to make this clear: Reverse engineering in itself is possibly not illegal. Discovering a trade secret by reverse engineering and then using the reverse engineered recipe to make your own product is most likely illegal. Creating the impression that you discovered a trade secret by reverse engineering and then used it to create your own product will get you sued, which will cost you more money than it is worth.

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source | link

There are two very strong reasons, legal and marketing.

The way that Coca Cola is created is a trade secret. It is not patented, the company just keeps it secret. As long as it is secret, other companies are free to create their own recipes, even their own, identical recipes, but it is illegal to create such a recipe by breaking into some office and stealing the original recipe, or by analysing the original drink. If you reverse engineered the recipe, you could expect to be taken to court. And your engineers would have to appear as witness and have the choice of saying the truth or turning themselves into criminals by lying. Not a good business strategy.

The other problem is that a company like Pepsi doesn't want to create something that tastes exactly like Coca Cola. Their customers buy their drinks because they prefer the different taste. If Pepsi changed their taste to be exactly like Coca Cola, they would just annoy their own customers.