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For chair-like transition states the angle at which you draw your chair can make a significant difference to how easy it is to visualise stereoelectronic interactions. Sadly, there is no real way to know which is the best way to draw it, except by either trial and error, or prior experience (or leveraging on other people's experience, i.e. copying it from somebody else!).

If you rotate the chair a bit so that the forming bond is in front (as opposed to at the side), then you can have something like this:

Chair TS for Cope rearrangement leading to (E)-alkene

You don't need to overthink how the sigma bond rotates; this is a sigmatropic rearrangement, not a electrocyclic reaction where there are conrotatory/disrotatory modes. The geometry at the substituted carbon definitely changes (from tetrahedral to trigonal planar), so there is some kind of "flattening" as the reaction proceeds, but all you really need to pay attention to is the relative disposition of the R substituent and the rest of the carbon chain: here they are clearly trans to one another, which is an (E)-alkene. This is stereospecific, so if you start with the conformation shown in the left, you will end up with a trans alkene. There isn't a different "rotation mode" that leads to the cis alkene.

The main way of getting a cis, or (Z)-alkene, is not reallyactually via a boat TS, but rather via a chair TS with the R substituent axial instead of equatorial. Note that this is a different conformation from the previous image, so again it's not about which direction the sigma bond rotates in, but rather the original location of the substituent (axial/equatorial). The orbital diagram is exactly the same, so there's no need to redraw it, but it should be easy enough to see that this leads to the reverse stereochemistry.

The boat TS is trickier to draw. This is my preferred representation:

Boat TSs

but I am not entirely sure which TS is higher in energy (i.e. whether the substituent prefers to point up or point down), even after consulting several references. I don't think it's a matter of great significance; after all, the boat TS usually only plays a very minor role, as far as I know.

For chair-like transition states the angle at which you draw your chair can make a significant difference to how easy it is to visualise stereoelectronic interactions. Sadly, there is no real way to know which is the best way to draw it, except by either trial and error, or prior experience (or leveraging on other people's experience, i.e. copying it from somebody else!).

If you rotate the chair a bit so that the forming bond is in front (as opposed to at the side), then you can have something like this:

Chair TS for Cope rearrangement leading to (E)-alkene

You don't need to overthink how the sigma bond rotates; this is a sigmatropic rearrangement, not a electrocyclic reaction where there are conrotatory/disrotatory modes. The geometry at the substituted carbon definitely changes (from tetrahedral to trigonal planar), so there is some kind of "flattening" as the reaction proceeds, but all you really need to pay attention to is the relative disposition of the R substituent and the rest of the carbon chain: here they are clearly trans to one another, which is an (E)-alkene.

The main way of getting a cis, or (Z)-alkene, is not really via a boat TS, but rather via a chair TS with the R substituent axial instead of equatorial. The orbital diagram is exactly the same, so there's no need to redraw it, but it should be easy enough to see that this leads to the reverse stereochemistry.

The boat TS is trickier to draw. This is my preferred representation:

Boat TSs

but I am not entirely sure which TS is higher in energy (i.e. whether the substituent prefers to point up or point down), even after consulting several references. I don't think it's a matter of great significance; after all, the boat TS usually only plays a very minor role, as far as I know.

For chair-like transition states the angle at which you draw your chair can make a significant difference to how easy it is to visualise stereoelectronic interactions. Sadly, there is no real way to know which is the best way to draw it, except by either trial and error, or prior experience (or leveraging on other people's experience, i.e. copying it from somebody else!).

If you rotate the chair a bit so that the forming bond is in front (as opposed to at the side), then you can have something like this:

Chair TS for Cope rearrangement leading to (E)-alkene

You don't need to overthink how the sigma bond rotates; this is a sigmatropic rearrangement, not a electrocyclic reaction where there are conrotatory/disrotatory modes. The geometry at the substituted carbon definitely changes (from tetrahedral to trigonal planar), so there is some kind of "flattening" as the reaction proceeds, but all you really need to pay attention to is the relative disposition of the R substituent and the rest of the carbon chain: here they are clearly trans to one another, which is an (E)-alkene. This is stereospecific, so if you start with the conformation shown in the left, you will end up with a trans alkene. There isn't a different "rotation mode" that leads to the cis alkene.

The main way of getting a cis, or (Z)-alkene, is not actually via a boat TS, but rather via a chair TS with the R substituent axial instead of equatorial. Note that this is a different conformation from the previous image, so again it's not about which direction the sigma bond rotates in, but rather the original location of the substituent (axial/equatorial). The orbital diagram is exactly the same, so there's no need to redraw it, but it should be easy enough to see that this leads to the reverse stereochemistry.

The boat TS is trickier to draw. This is my preferred representation:

Boat TSs

but I am not entirely sure which TS is higher in energy (i.e. whether the substituent prefers to point up or point down), even after consulting several references. I don't think it's a matter of great significance; after all, the boat TS usually only plays a very minor role, as far as I know.

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For chair-like transition states the angle at which you draw your chair can make a significant difference to how easy it is to visualise stereoelectronic interactions. Sadly, there is no real way to know which is the best way to draw it, except by either trial and error, or prior experience (or leveraging on other people's experience, i.e. copying it from somebody else!).

If you rotate the chair a bit so that the forming bond is in front (as opposed to at the side), then you can have something like this:

Chair TS for Cope rearrangement leading to (E)-alkene

You don't need to overthink how the sigma bond rotates; this is a sigmatropic rearrangement, not a electrocyclic reaction where there are conrotatory/disrotatory modes. The geometry at the substituted carbon definitely changes (from tetrahedral to trigonal planar), so there is some kind of "flattening" as the reaction proceeds, but all you really need to pay attention to is the relative disposition of the R substituent and the rest of the carbon chain: here they are clearly trans to one another, which is an (E)-alkene.

The main way of getting a cis, or (Z)-alkene, is not really via a boat TS, but rather via a chair TS with the R substituent axial instead of equatorial. The orbital diagram is exactly the same, so there's no need to redraw it, but it should be easy enough to see that this leads to the reverse stereochemistry.

The boat TS is trickier to draw. This is my preferred representation:

Boat TSs

but I am not entirely sure which TS is higher in energy (i.e. whether the substituent prefers to point up or point down), even after consulting several references. I don't think it's a matter of great significance; after all, the boat TS usually only plays a very minor role, as far as I know.