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I have recently learnt about atomic structure and the bohrBohr model of the atom and have observed a discrepancy between it and my previous knowledge based on physics.

For simplicity, assume the atom is of hydrogen.

Total Eenergy of electron= -13.6electron ((z^2)/(n^2)) eV/atom

$$E= -13.6 \left(\frac{z^2}{n^2}\right) \pu{eV/atom}$$ where z$z$ is atomic number, n$n$ is energy level.

Thus, at n=∞$n=\infty$, E=0$E=0$.

Now, by the relation Total Energy=Energy = potential energy/2 (from TE=-KE=PE/2$TE=-KE=PE/2$),

PE=0/2$$PE=0/2$$ so PE=0$$PE=0$$

Now, the infinite energy level (n=∞$n=\infty$) occurs at a finite distance from nucleus (as the difference in distance between the energy levels decreases at higher energy levels).

Thus, PE=0$PE=0$ at a finite distance from the nucleus.

But, I have previously studied that PE$PE$ of a system of a negative charge  (electron) and positive charge(nucleus) is =0$=0$ only at an infinite distance.

Thus, the discrepancy.

Please let me know where I have gone wrong.

I have recently learnt about atomic structure and the bohr model of the atom and have observed a discrepancy between it and my previous knowledge based on physics.

For simplicity, assume the atom is of hydrogen.

Total E of electron= -13.6 ((z^2)/(n^2)) eV/atom

where z is atomic number, n is energy level

Thus, at n=∞, E=0

Now, by the relation Total Energy= potential energy/2 (from TE=-KE=PE/2)

PE=0/2 so PE=0

Now, the infinite energy level (n=∞) occurs at a finite distance from nucleus (as the difference in distance between the energy levels decreases at higher energy levels).

Thus, PE=0 at a finite distance from the nucleus.

But, I have previously studied that PE of a system of a negative charge(electron) and positive charge(nucleus) is =0 only at an infinite distance.

Thus, the discrepancy.

Please let me know where I have gone wrong.

I have recently learnt about atomic structure and the Bohr model of the atom and have observed a discrepancy between it and my previous knowledge based on physics.

For simplicity, assume the atom is of hydrogen.

Total energy of electron $$E= -13.6 \left(\frac{z^2}{n^2}\right) \pu{eV/atom}$$ where $z$ is atomic number, $n$ is energy level.

Thus, at $n=\infty$, $E=0$.

Now, by the relation Total Energy = potential energy/2 (from $TE=-KE=PE/2$),

$$PE=0/2$$ so $$PE=0$$

Now, the infinite energy level ($n=\infty$) occurs at a finite distance from nucleus (as the difference in distance between the energy levels decreases at higher energy levels).

Thus, $PE=0$ at a finite distance from the nucleus.

But, I have previously studied that $PE$ of a system of a negative charge  (electron) and positive charge(nucleus) is $=0$ only at an infinite distance.

Thus, the discrepancy.

Please let me know where I have gone wrong.

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