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http://www.watertechonline.com/drinking-water/article/the-fine-points-of-methane-removal

When you are diluting air in the system and/or properly evacuating it, you must consider water temperature. Methane is completely dissolved in water at 42 degrees Fahrenheit (5.5 C) but can be completely released (as a gas) at 58 degrees F (14.5 C). (source)

This would seem to imply that the enthalpy of solution for methane in water is negative (i.e. the process is exothermic). But, intuitively, it seems that you would have to input energy to force non-polar and polar to mingle.

Can anyone explain why this might be the case?

http://www.watertechonline.com/drinking-water/article/the-fine-points-of-methane-removal

When you are diluting air in the system and/or properly evacuating it, you must consider water temperature. Methane is completely dissolved in water at 42 degrees Fahrenheit (5.5 C) but can be completely released (as a gas) at 58 degrees F (14.5 C).

This would seem to imply that the enthalpy of solution for methane in water is negative (i.e. the process is exothermic). But, intuitively, it seems that you would have to input energy to force non-polar and polar to mingle.

Can anyone explain why this might be the case?

When you are diluting air in the system and/or properly evacuating it, you must consider water temperature. Methane is completely dissolved in water at 42 degrees Fahrenheit (5.5 C) but can be completely released (as a gas) at 58 degrees F (14.5 C). (source)

This would seem to imply that the enthalpy of solution for methane in water is negative (i.e. the process is exothermic). But, intuitively, it seems that you would have to input energy to force non-polar and polar to mingle.

Can anyone explain why this might be the case?

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2 deleted 130 characters in body
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http://www.watertechonline.com/drinking-water/article/the-fine-points-of-methane-removal

When you are diluting air in the system and/or properly evacuating it, you must consider water temperature. Methane is completely dissolved in water at 42 degrees Fahrenheit (5.5 C) but can be completely released (as a gas) at 58 degrees F (14.5 C).

This would seem to imply that the enthalpy of solution for methane in water is negative (i.e. the process is exothermic). But, intuitively, it seems that you would have to input energy to force non-polar and polar to mingle.

My impression from a little bit of searching is that this is currently a topic of research. Can anyone summarize the state of the art for explainingexplain why this might be the case?

http://www.watertechonline.com/drinking-water/article/the-fine-points-of-methane-removal

When you are diluting air in the system and/or properly evacuating it, you must consider water temperature. Methane is completely dissolved in water at 42 degrees Fahrenheit (5.5 C) but can be completely released (as a gas) at 58 degrees F (14.5 C).

This would seem to imply that the enthalpy of solution for methane in water is negative (i.e. the process is exothermic). But, intuitively, it seems that you would have to input energy to force non-polar and polar to mingle.

My impression from a little bit of searching is that this is currently a topic of research. Can anyone summarize the state of the art for explaining why this might be the case?

http://www.watertechonline.com/drinking-water/article/the-fine-points-of-methane-removal

When you are diluting air in the system and/or properly evacuating it, you must consider water temperature. Methane is completely dissolved in water at 42 degrees Fahrenheit (5.5 C) but can be completely released (as a gas) at 58 degrees F (14.5 C).

This would seem to imply that the enthalpy of solution for methane in water is negative (i.e. the process is exothermic). But, intuitively, it seems that you would have to input energy to force non-polar and polar to mingle.

Can anyone explain why this might be the case?

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