3 Attempt to recover by removing unnecessary markup and formatting math with MathJax
source | link

In a PChemphysical chemistry class, the profprofessor derived Sentropy $S$ as a function of concentration starting from S=kln(W). Somehow he made a mistake and ended up with the wrong sign. This remains unsolved until the end of the class. So I would like to figure out the correct solution before the next class. The final answer is S=-kln(conc.) + S^o, where S^o is the entropy of the substance in standard state. I know that concentration is inversely proportional to the multiplicity should be used somewhere, but I cannot complete the whole derivation.So far I have got that S=-kln(conc$S=k\ln(W)$.)+kln(N), where N is the number of particles. But why is the kln(N) Somehow he made a mistake and ended up with the wrong sign. This remains unsolved until the end of the class.

So I would like to figure out the correct solution before the next class. The final answer is

$$S=-k\ln(\text{conc.}) + S^\circ,$$

where $S^\circ$ is the entropy of the substance in standard state. I know that concentration is inversely proportional to the multiplicity should be used somewhere, but I cannot complete the whole derivation.

So far I have got that

$$S = -k\ln(\text{conc.}) + k\ln(N),$$

where $N$ is the number of particles. But why is the $k\ln(N)$ part S^o$S^\circ$?

In a PChem class, the prof derived S as a function of concentration starting from S=kln(W). Somehow he made a mistake and ended up with the wrong sign. This remains unsolved until the end of the class. So I would like to figure out the correct solution before the next class. The final answer is S=-kln(conc.) + S^o, where S^o is the entropy of the substance in standard state. I know that concentration is inversely proportional to the multiplicity should be used somewhere, but I cannot complete the whole derivation.So far I have got that S=-kln(conc.)+kln(N), where N is the number of particles. But why is the kln(N) part S^o?

In a physical chemistry class, the professor derived entropy $S$ as a function of concentration starting from $S=k\ln(W)$. Somehow he made a mistake and ended up with the wrong sign. This remains unsolved until the end of the class.

So I would like to figure out the correct solution before the next class. The final answer is

$$S=-k\ln(\text{conc.}) + S^\circ,$$

where $S^\circ$ is the entropy of the substance in standard state. I know that concentration is inversely proportional to the multiplicity should be used somewhere, but I cannot complete the whole derivation.

So far I have got that

$$S = -k\ln(\text{conc.}) + k\ln(N),$$

where $N$ is the number of particles. But why is the $k\ln(N)$ part $S^\circ$?

2 added 115 characters in body
source | link

In a PChem class, the prof derived S as a function of concentration starting from S=k*ln(W). Somehow he made a mistake and ended up with the wrong sign. This remains unsolved until the end of the class. So I would like to figure out the correct solution before the next class. The final answer is S=-klnS=kln(W). Somehow he made a mistake and ended up with the wrong sign. This remains unsolved until the end of the class. So I would like to figure out the correct solution before the next class. The final answer is S=-kln(conc.) + S^o, where S^o is the entropy of the substance in standard state. I know that concentration is inversely proportional to the multiplicity should be used somewhere, but I cannot complete the whole derivation.So far I have got that S=-kln(conc.) + S^o, where+kln(N), where N is the number of particles. But why is the kln(N) part S^o is the entropy of the substance in standard state. I know that concentration is inversely proportional to the multiplicity should be used somewhere, but I cannot complete the whole derivation.?

In a PChem class, the prof derived S as a function of concentration starting from S=k*ln(W). Somehow he made a mistake and ended up with the wrong sign. This remains unsolved until the end of the class. So I would like to figure out the correct solution before the next class. The final answer is S=-kln(conc.) + S^o, where S^o is the entropy of the substance in standard state. I know that concentration is inversely proportional to the multiplicity should be used somewhere, but I cannot complete the whole derivation.

In a PChem class, the prof derived S as a function of concentration starting from S=kln(W). Somehow he made a mistake and ended up with the wrong sign. This remains unsolved until the end of the class. So I would like to figure out the correct solution before the next class. The final answer is S=-kln(conc.) + S^o, where S^o is the entropy of the substance in standard state. I know that concentration is inversely proportional to the multiplicity should be used somewhere, but I cannot complete the whole derivation.So far I have got that S=-kln(conc.)+kln(N), where N is the number of particles. But why is the kln(N) part S^o?

1
source | link

Deriving the entropy as a function of concentration

In a PChem class, the prof derived S as a function of concentration starting from S=k*ln(W). Somehow he made a mistake and ended up with the wrong sign. This remains unsolved until the end of the class. So I would like to figure out the correct solution before the next class. The final answer is S=-kln(conc.) + S^o, where S^o is the entropy of the substance in standard state. I know that concentration is inversely proportional to the multiplicity should be used somewhere, but I cannot complete the whole derivation.