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The short answer is NO.

There is no single complete theory that is able to predict what products will result from combining a number of reactants. Note that the products of a chemical reaction are not only a function of the reactants, but also of temperature, pressure, catalyst present and several other factors.

You will be hard pressed to find any Chemistry book that even starts to attempt to describe a predictive model.

Because of this huge gap in scientific knowledge the best next thing is to empirically test what happens when reactants are brought together under certain conditions and then find similarities when different reactants of the same general type are used.

For example if empirically you establish that:

CH2=CH2 + HCl -> CH3CH2Cl and$$\ce{CH2=CH2 + HCl -> CH3CH2Cl}\\ \text{and}$$

CH3CH=CH2 + HCl -> CH3CH2CH2Cl$$\ce{CH3CH=CH2 + HCl -> CH3CH2CH2Cl}$$

You could predict that in any reaction of the type RCH=CH2 + HCl the following type of product will be found: RCH2CH2Cl

This is one of the reasons Organic Chemistry books are so thick. Since there a many types of substances, they are grouped together as members of a family that are known to react in a certain manner under certain conditions.

The predictive power of this method is rather weak, since it only applies to a very narrow set of circumstances, but there does not exist a better system today.

The short answer is NO.

There is no single complete theory that is able to predict what products will result from combining a number of reactants. Note that the products of a chemical reaction are not only a function of the reactants, but also of temperature, pressure, catalyst present and several other factors.

You will be hard pressed to find any Chemistry book that even starts to attempt to describe a predictive model.

Because of this huge gap in scientific knowledge the best next thing is to empirically test what happens when reactants are brought together under certain conditions and then find similarities when different reactants of the same general type are used.

For example if empirically you establish that:

CH2=CH2 + HCl -> CH3CH2Cl and

CH3CH=CH2 + HCl -> CH3CH2CH2Cl

You could predict that in any reaction of the type RCH=CH2 + HCl the following type of product will be found: RCH2CH2Cl

This is one of the reasons Organic Chemistry books are so thick. Since there a many types of substances, they are grouped together as members of a family that are known to react in a certain manner under certain conditions.

The predictive power of this method is rather weak, since it only applies to a very narrow set of circumstances, but there does not exist a better system today.

The short answer is NO.

There is no single complete theory that is able to predict what products will result from combining a number of reactants. Note that the products of a chemical reaction are not only a function of the reactants, but also of temperature, pressure, catalyst present and several other factors.

You will be hard pressed to find any Chemistry book that even starts to attempt to describe a predictive model.

Because of this huge gap in scientific knowledge the best next thing is to empirically test what happens when reactants are brought together under certain conditions and then find similarities when different reactants of the same general type are used.

For example if empirically you establish that:

$$\ce{CH2=CH2 + HCl -> CH3CH2Cl}\\ \text{and}$$

$$\ce{CH3CH=CH2 + HCl -> CH3CH2CH2Cl}$$

You could predict that in any reaction of the type RCH=CH2 + HCl the following type of product will be found: RCH2CH2Cl

This is one of the reasons Organic Chemistry books are so thick. Since there a many types of substances, they are grouped together as members of a family that are known to react in a certain manner under certain conditions.

The predictive power of this method is rather weak, since it only applies to a very narrow set of circumstances, but there does not exist a better system today.

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The short answer is NO.

There is no single complete theory that is able to predict what products will result from combining a number of reactants. Note that the products of a chemical reaction are not only a function of the reactants, but also of temperature, pressure, catalyst present and several other factors.

You will be hard pressed to find any Chemistry book that even starts to attempt to describe a predictive model.

Because of this huge gap in scientific knowledge the best next thing is to empirically test what happens when reactants are brought together under certain conditions and then find similarities when different reactants of the same general type are used.

For example if empirically you establish that:

CH2=CH2 + HCl -> CH3CH2Cl and

CH3CH=CH2 + HCl -> CH3CH2CH2Cl

You could predict that in any reaction of the type RCH=CH2 + HCl the following type of product will be found: RCH2CH2Cl

This is one of the reasons Organic Chemistry books are so thick. Since there a many types of substances, they are grouped together as members of a family that are known to react in a certain manner under certain conditions.

The predictive power of this method is rather weak, since it only applies to a very narrow set of circumstances, but there does not exist a better system today.