For questions regarding how something is referred to.

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“Limit test” vs. “Titration” in a pharmaceutical guide

From the "Technical guide for the elaboration of monographs" by EDQM, edition 7, 2015, page 35: Where the introduction of tests for foreign anions in organic substances is considered then a single ...
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223 views

What is a “lower organic acid”?

From the "Technical guide for the elaboration of monographs" by EDQM, edition 7, 2015, page 25: Where the counter-ion of an active substance is formed from a lower organic acid, a test for related ...
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25 views

What is the meaning of 'anion water' in coordination chemistry?

In Mechanisms of Inorganic Reactions by Fred Basolo and Ralph G. Pearson, a passage discusses the history of coordination chemistry. Ammoniates had been assumed to be analogous to hydrates. They ...
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158 views

In Hückel's rule, can n be any integer?

Hückel's rule says that any planar compound with a ring of conjugated p orbitals with $4n+2$ electrons is aromatic. Here, can $n$ be any integer, or does $n$ have to be related to the number of p ...
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167 views

Is acetone saturated or not?

This was a question in a chemistry exam: How many moles of hydrogen is required to convert 1 mole of this compound into a saturated compound? $\ce{CH3COCH3}$ (acetone) Some teachers said ...
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35 views

Significant Figures Calculations

I am confused regarding significant figures. Consider "Calculate the volume of 2.8 kg of liquid with density of 1.11 g/cm^3" Then, Volume = 2.8 kg * (cm^3 / 1.11 g) = 2522.522 (where 522 is recurring)...
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41 views

Why is the production of aspirin considered a synthesis?

In chemistry, a synthesis reaction is a reaction in which multiple reactants combine to make one main product. However, when aspirin is produced, this is also considered a synthesis reaction even ...
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54 views

Chemical processes and chemical reactions difference

Whats the difference between chemical processes and chemical reactions? Ive heard that the chemical industries only uses chemical processes to produce new substances, but isnt that also what happens ...
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42 views

Definition of drift

What does drift actually mean in analytical chemistry? I can't find the exact definition and now am not sure whether my intuitive understanding of it is correct.
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156 views

Clear definition of a 'non-oxidizing acid'?

From the Beryllium article on Wikipedia: Beryllium dissolves readily in non-oxidizing acids, such as $\ce{HCl}$ and diluted $\ce{H2SO4}$, but not in nitric acid or water as this forms the oxide. ...
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44 views

Isn't the reaction of chloral with sodium hydroxide a disproportionation reaction?

Chloral undergoes a haloform reaction with sodium hydroxide. Now the carbon atoms in chloral are in the $\mathrm{+III}$ and $\mathrm{+I}$ oxidation state. Chloroform’s carbon is in the $\mathrm{+II}$ ...
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Collective term for acid/base; hydronium/hydroxide

When writing about acids and bases it would seem very natural for me to abstract the set of both acids and bases and have a single noun for them, instead of cumbersomly listing them both each time. ...
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26 views

What is the absolute configuration of carbon 4 in glucopyranose?

My colleague and I have been wrestling with the assignment of chirality to the 4th carbon atom in glucopyranose. In the linear form of glucose, the 4th carbon is definitely (R); therefore it will ...
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407 views

What are compounds with the same mass called?

It may be that the answer is just "no" and that's why I can't find it, but is there any common name for compounds with the same mass? I'm thinking in the context of mass spectrometry where these ...
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43 views

Do you say “reduce something to polystyrene”?

this question may not fit in this forum because it's about English, but biochemistry knowledge is required, so please allow me to make this thread. When you measure the molecular weight of a polymer, ...
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47 views

Does the synthesis of beta-keto phosphonates from esters have a name?

Consider the Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons reaction; one of its reactants is a phosphonate, usually stabilised by a β-carbonyl group which is then deprotonated in α position (figure 1). These ...
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2answers
102 views

Thermodynamic versus kinetic reactions

In a lecture, teacher said "Nucleophilicity is about 'kinetic', and basicity is about 'thermodynamic'" but I saw the picture below from another source. Here, both pathways start with an acid/base ...
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68 views

What is the name for a reaction with a solid product rising from its container?

The reaction between sugar and sulfuric acid is well known to produce a solid column of rising carbon which may leave its container. A very similar rising column may also be produced from high ...
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84 views

What is a 'corona phase'?

What is a 'corona phase'? I have come across this term in several papers, including this one but all I have found concerning its definition is: [...] synthetic heteropolymers, once constrained ...
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46 views

Is a galvanic cell only called that if copper and zinc are used?

I know other metals can be used to get the same effect but I'm interested in the name. Is it only called a galvanic cell if copper and zinc are used? Or is the name "voltaic cell" used only when ...
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Difference between thermal reactions and photochemical reactions

In a photochemical reaction, everything starts with absorption of a photon. I.e. a ground state reactant is excited to the first excited state. Sometimes the reaction barrier on the ground state ...
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1answer
189 views

What is the Franck-Condon region

What precisely is the Franck-Condon region? My understanding is that the FC region is the "bonding" or "equilibrium" region in a potential energy surface, i.e. near the minimum. But when a transition ...
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38 views

Is lithium hydride a salt?

Hydrogen is generally considered a non-metal, and a non-metal and a metal often makes a salt. However, lithium hydride seems like a special case. The wikipedia article does not clearly state if the ...
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39 views

Molar heat capacity and heat capacity

Is molar heat capacity and heat capacity at constant volume both represented by $C_v$? at constant pressure both represented by $C_p$?
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Why is Sodium acetate called a salt of weak acid and strong base, when Acetic acid acts as a strong acid in Sodium hydroxide soln.?

Why is Sodium acetate called a salt of weak acid and strong base, when Acetic acid behaves as a strong acid (i.e. it shows almost cent percent dissociation) in Sodium hydroxide solution ?
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Why carbon is so special? [duplicate]

One special branch in chemistry is allotted to compounds of only one element (carbon). Is it justified when there are more than 115 elements and their compounds but not with any special branches?
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Difference between Resonance Effect and Mesomeric Effect

While studying electron displacement effects in organic chemistry, I read that the Resonance Effect and Mesomeric Effect are the same. Every source I checked used the heading or opening "The Resonance ...
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30 views

Which preposition to use for the reducing agent?

Which expression is correct when we use the prepositions with or by for indicating that the reduction is carried out using $\ce{NaBH4}$ as a reductor: It is reduced to sodium phenylselenolate with ...
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87 views

Why are protons in the same position in 1-chloro-4-nitrobenzene magnetically different?

Protons in ortho positions towards the nitro group are said to be magnetically different, even though they're chemically equivalent. Same goes for protons ortho towards the chlorine. Why is that so?
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62 views

What kind of reactions are these? Am I wrong?

$\ce{CaO + 2 HF -> CaF2 + H2O}$ $\ce{2NH4(OH) + H2SO4 -> (NH4)2SO4 + 2 H2O}$ $\ce{N2O5 + H2O -> 2HNO3}$ $\ce{Cu + HNO3 -> Cu(NO3) + NO + H2O}$ $\ce{Zn + 2 HCl -> H2 + ZnCl2}$ $...
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53 views

What is the meaning of ‘oxyphilic’?

I read in the paper that: The reduction of diphenyl diselenide using lithium aluminum hydride generates a selenolate ion having Lewis acid character due to the oxygenophilic nature of the ...
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117 views

What is the adverb for a “hydrogen bond”?

I am looking for some opinions concerning the terminology around hydrogen bonds. Other types of bonds can be expressed as an adjective: "The atoms are bonded covalently." or (though less common) "(...)...
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255 views

Is this definition of mole correct?

Chemical engineers define one mole as the amount of a substance which possess as many entities as $12\ \mathrm g$ of $\ce{^{12}C}$. The number of atoms in $12\ \mathrm g$ of $\ce{^{12}C}$ is $6.022 \...
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Why is vulcanization called “vulcanization”?

I know it might sound a dumb question but whenever I come across a note on importance of vulcanization I get stuck as to the meaning of the term and why it was adopted.
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201 views

Where does the name ‘aliphatic’ come from?

Generally, carbons and the hydrogens bonded to them are classified as one of the following: aromatic olefinic aliphatic (something for triple bonds I don’t know) The meaning of aromatic is rather ...
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63 views

What's the difference between pharmacotherapy and chemotherapy

Is it fair to say that pharmacotherapy (the use of pharmaceuticals to treat disease) is a subset of chemotherapy (the use of chemicals to treat disease)? If not, why? Aside from the fact the former ...
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1answer
45 views

What word, or phrase, do chemists use to describe the color saturation of a solution?

Outside of chemistry, I've used the word saturation to talk about how blue (or how green, red, etc.) something is. In the lab that I'm writing, I have three undesirable options: use saturation and ...
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1 degree, 2 degree, 3 degree amines are functional group isomers?

Consider $\ce{C3H7NH2}$. Can one make $3$ different isomers with this molecular formula? My question is that are they functional group isomers or chain isomers? I have been told that they are ...
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43 views

Terminology for “proton stripping”?

This is going to probably be an easy question for an organic chemist, but I am looking for the proper terminology to describe the following reaction mechanism. In particular, what is a more precise ...
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71 views

What is primary valency in coordination chemistry?

In Werner Theory, is primary valency the oxidation number of central metal ion/atom, or is it the total charge on the coordination sphere of the coordination compound? Different sources mention ...
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Orthogonal Wavefunctions

My current understanding of orthogonal wavefunctions is: two wavefunctions that are perpendicular to each other and must satisfy the following equation: $$\int\psi_1\, \psi_2\, \mathrm{d}\tau =0$$ ...
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44 views

What is the term for a compound where one element exists in two oxidation states in the same molecule?

Example nitrogen in $\ce{N2O}$ (−3 and +5). I'm pretty sure there's a term but I've forgotten what it is I thought it was disproportionation but this seems to only refer to a reaction
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324 views

The difference between one pot synthetic method and one step reaction

I often read in the papers of organic synthesis that the reactions can be carried out in one-pot method, and the others can be realized in one-step. I want to know the difference between one pot and ...
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118 views

What is the physical quantity/magnitude of pH?

I have a database to classify variables/parameters in water resources as follows: Variable: Precipitation (P); Quantity: Length; Units of measurement: mm (millimeters). Following the example, what ...
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Intensive properties clarification - Chemical thermodynamics

I just started learning chemical thermodynamics and have come upon the definitions for extensive and intensive properties. I had a great deal of confusion over the exact meaning of intensive ...
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456 views

What do positive, negative and zero overlap of atomic orbitals mean?

I am confused about positive, negative and zero overlaps. Do they represent the extent of overlap or are they related to the bonding and anti-bonding orbitals as described in Molecular Orbital ...
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1answer
51 views

Hydrates In Aqueous Solutions

Say you had copper(II) sulfate pentahydrate as a solid. In an aqueous solution, is it still referred to by its hydrated form? Is it still called copper(II) sulfate pentahydrate (aqueous) or simply ...
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193 views

What is the difference between reactant and reagent?

What is the difference between reactants and reagents? I've seen both used for very similar situations... The dictionary said that reagents are added to a reaction to identify another substance, but ...
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60 views

Chemical expression and terminology

Is this expression correct "the reaction was not accomplished " when we check the final product finding two or more spots on TLC paper ?
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Micelles absorb fat, is there an adjective for this?

"Hygroscopic" means the capacity to absorb water. Is there an adjective to describe the same idea except for the absorption of lipids? Like, when you wash your hands with soap and the soap micelles ...