A metal is an element, compound, or alloy that is a good conductor of both electricity and heat.

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Why is mercury's surface tension so high, when its viscosity is low?

At a basic level, both surface tension and viscosity are the result of forces between particles. Usually we'd talk about intermolecular forces, because liquids are usually molecules, but obviously ...
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the longevity of amorphous metal

I have been recently introduced to this new concept of amorphous solids, in particular, amorphous metals, and I came up with the following problems that could not be answered with my somewhat ...
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How does vinegar get rust off these coins

As experiment I found some really nasty rusty coins on the street. They were green. After looking on a website I found vinegar could eliminate the rust. It worked pretty well. I know this is a redox ...
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Why do polymers have higher coefficients of linear thermal expansion than metals?

What started out as a homework question is now bothering my brain. I have always known that metals expand pretty well when their temperatures increase. Also, I have never heard of polymers like Teflon ...
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Can copper, nickel and chrome plating process only be done with HCl solution?

I want to know if electroplating process can only be done with HCl acid, without any copper, nickel , zinc and chrome liquid solutions? means equipment DC battery anode rode (zinc, copper, nickel ...
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45 views

Does mercury amalgamate with Brass or Steel?

Does mercury amalgamate with Brass & Steel ? Details: I am designing a micro pump to dispense mercury in micro quantities (300 - 700 mg). I am planning to use 2 check valves with syringe to suck ...
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Relative etch rates of nitric acid on metals and oxides

I am trying to either find or calculate the etch rate of nitric acid ($\ce{HNO3}$) for various different metals and oxides. The ones I am interested in are titanium ($\ce{Ti}$), zirconium ($\ce{Zr}$), ...
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Enthalpy of Formation of Alkali Metal Halides [duplicate]

A book that I am currently reading contains the following lines :- The Enthalpy of formation for fluorides become less negative as we go down the group, whilst the reverse is true for the Enthalpy ...
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54 views

Calcium reactivity vs electronic configuration

Calcium is an alkaline earth metal, so it is reactive. But, it has two valence electrons. Don't those two electrons fill up the first energy level? Isn't an atom with a full energy level considered ...
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Would tin (II) sulfide be considered a covalent network solid?

Considering that tin has a Pauling electronegativity of 1.96 and sulphur 2.58, and that a bond is considered to be ionic with a Pauling EN difference of approx. 1.7 at the least, would tin (II) ...
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Why does dry boiling discolor steel cookware?

I have a stainless steel kettle that I let boil dry. That is, I left it on a hot coil burner with nothing in it, and noticed a few minutes later that the bottom was red hot and smoking. To make ...
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How does a metal atom's size affect the electrical conductivity of it's giant metallic structure?

In giant metallic structures, how does a metal atom's size affect the structure's electrical conductivity? (i.e. what happens if you go down a group of metal elements?)
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Can 2 pieces of metals combine after long time contact?

Does 2 pieces of metals combine automatically after long time contact because of atom vibration and collision and finally form metallic bonds between the contact surface?
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How are the boiling points of Tungsten and other metals determined and proved?

The boiling point of Tungsten is 10,030 degrees Fahrenheit. How was this determined and proved? And more generally how are the boiling points of metals determined and proved? Is it really so simple ...
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Why do we say metals are monoatomic in nature?

Are metals monoatomic or polyatomic in nature? For in crystalline form they also form molecular orbitals.
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How does the electron configuration of platinum relate to its stability?

Does platinum's electron configuration, [Xe] 4f14 5d9 6s1, influence its reactivity and stability? Is the electron configuration the primary contributing factor to platinum's relative inertness? ...
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57 views

Heavy Metal Toxicity [closed]

Ok, so I am working on a project where I have to make a tax for manufacturers using non recyclable materials. So for this tax you multiply the weight (in kg) by how toxic the material is, this gives ...
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Lattice structures, Metallic Bonding

How and under what circumstances can cations form a lattice structure? Would they not repel each other?
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What is the difference between galvanization and sacrificial protection?

If we use zinc in both methods, then the same process occurs: zinc corrodes in preference to iron, and eventually zinc has to be replaced. So what's the difference?
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Why are overcoats used on aluminum if aluminum oxide forms on surface anyway?

If a thin layer of aluminum oxide is formed on the surface of aluminum to prevent further oxidization, why are optical components using extra "overcoat" materials to prevent dulling of the metal over ...
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Metallic bonding and covalent boding

Why do metallic bonds have delocalized electrons, whereas covalent bonds only share electrons? Does it have something to with the atomic masses of the individual non/metals or something else? I'm ...
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Generally, why are some metal elements more reactive than others? [duplicate]

I have just read that reactive metal elements are extracted through electrolysis, however, less reactive metals are extracted through a reaction with carbon or carbon monoxide. In both cases the ...
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Why is gold so popular in nanotechnology?

Gold is a very popular metal in nanotechnology. It is often used as a substrate in electronic applications, as a core of functionalized nanoparticles, and more. Why is gold so attractive? Why are ...
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Spectroscopy and Excitation of Electrons

As metals are heated, they glow white and then blue. How might you explain this change in color as the temperature of the metal is increased? My answer consist of the idea that with increased thermal ...
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What metals can be melted inertly in alumina crucible? [closed]

Specifically, a crucible made from 90+% Aluminum Oxide. What metals can be melted in it without any weird reaction taking place?
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Is there a way of dissolving metals in water and then coating something?

I'm wondering if I could dissolve a metal in water and then have it coat an object that I place in the water? The object would somehow have to attract the metal.
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Are there general rules for Base + Metal Compound reactions like there are for Acids?

Are there general rules for Base + Metal Compound reactions like there are for Acids? For example, acids have some general rules. ** Acid + Metal => Salt + Hydrogen Gas Acid + Metal Carbonate => ...
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How do I find the diameter of an Aluminum atom? [closed]

I am supposed to find the diameter of an Aluminum atom using data given by my teacher. Here is the data: ...
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397 views

How do I calculate the cost of a single Aluminum atom?

I am doing a Chemistry assignment in which I was given a piece of aluminum foil which I had to measure and use for my calculations. I am supposed to calculate the cost of a single aluminum atom using ...
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Why does mercury form polycations?

For example, mercury (I) is $\ce{Hg2^2+}$ and not $\ce{Hg+}$. What causes the stability in covalently bonded $\ce{Hg}$ ions? Are there any other metals that also bond covalently?
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Why doesn't my stainless steel Thermos get really really hot?

Why doesn't my stainless steel Thermos get really really hot? Seems like a fairly straightforward question. A few notes: I was looking and found (obviously different values because steel is an ...
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52 views

Does Photoelectric effect occur in a micro-oven while heating food? [closed]

Does the photoelectric effect occur while heating food on a metal plate in a microwave oven? If not, then why doesn't it occur?
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100 views

How to test for heavy metal in water?

Is there a way to test if water has toxic heavy metals. Samples to both the water and people who drink it are available. Preferably, it should be done with at hold materials. I could also borrow ...
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Do only metals form ions?

Do nonmetals form ions? I am asking this because I was reading something and I came across the phrase "metal ions," which left me to wonder whether or not there are nonmetal ions as well.
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What are the intermolecular and intramolecular forces between Hg molecules/ atoms in liquid mercury?

Mercury is the only metal that is liquid at room temperature. I know that metallic bonding exists between metal atoms but my knowledge is limited to metallic bonding found in solids. Will there ...
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132 views

Does a gold detector exist?

I see many sites that claim to sell working gold detectors but I am not convinced that they work. Also, does a metal detector detect gold?
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Miscibility of Molten Metals

While reading about the size of atoms and ions of the Group 1 elements in the textbook "Concise Inorganic Chemistry" by JD Lee, I came across this line: The Li+ is much smaller than the other ...
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Does sodium produce water when it reacts with water?

My 10th grade chemistry book states that: "Metals react with water and produce a metal oxide and hydrogen gas. Metal oxides that are soluble in water dissolve in it to further form metal ...
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Calculating Molar Volume from crystal volume

I am trying to calculate molar volume of certain crystal lattices to be used for crystal growth kinetics calculations. The information I have is the crystal volume & crystal lattices. For example ...
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Organic solutions that corrode metals

Most of the common organic solvents are regarded as noncorrosive, but stainless steel can be attacked by formic, acetic, and propanoic acids. Corrosion of stainless steel by organic solvent ...
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protecting contact between aluminium and copper wires

The quarters in which I live has both aluminum and copper household wiring. This results in corrosion of the contacts and can lead to sparking, overheating, and even fire. Is there any way to ...
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Improving copper contact and preventing oxidation

I have a model railway in which I use pure copper on the tracks and in the engine to power the train with electricity. Is there any solution to prevent the copper surfaces from corrosion, and maybe ...
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Ag-Sn-Cu Phase diagram to formulate homogenization temperature / duration

I am working on Ag-Sn-Cu alloy phase diagram to figure out the best temperature / duration to homogenize the alloy (annealing). The %age of elements in the alloy are Ag - 40 % Cu - 27.8% Sn - 32.2 % ...
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Why is it that the least reactive metals are the best electrical conductors?

Silver, Gold and Platinum are amongst the best conductors of electricity, but also the amongst the most unreactive. Since electrical conductivity depends on the number of delocalized electrons (along ...
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Why dishwashers are corrosive to aluminum?

When I put aluminium parts into my dishwasher, they get tainted and they are sometime covered with white dots similar to salt. I don't think it is aluminium oxide. What are the chemical reactions ...
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why platinum/palladium are such a good catalyst?

Platinum and palladium are great catalysts. At the same time, other metals of the same family are not. What are the atomic level reasons for this?
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Why are noble metals more electronegative then most metals?

I was researching about electronegativity when I looked up what a graph of electronegativity within the periodic table is. And, this appeared. I scanned it, matching up everything I knew about the ...
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Is aluminium a metal or metalloid?

Aluminium is along the dark line of the Periodic Table and it is $p$-block metal. Is it metal or a metalloid? Why?
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Why does cationic charge density affect metallic bonding?

Group II metals have a smaller cationic size but one more valence electron than Group I metals. Why would the higher charge density of a metal cation affect the strength of the bonding of it in its ...
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Could milk rust a steel teaspoon?

Recently, while cleaning a neighbour's fridge (turned off for a few weeks), I came across a cup (closed with a lid). Inside the cup was, to my olfactory horror, congealed milk, with a steel (iron) ...