The forces, either attractive or repulsive, that exist between molecules due to electric charge.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

0
votes
0answers
10 views

Solvation rates of crystalline and noncrystalline materials

Assuming equal surface area (and other variables), would a highly ordered crystal of some substance dissolve more slowly or quickly than (or at the same rate as) a disordered sample of the same ...
1
vote
0answers
18 views

Does ion dissociation affect things such as molality, molarity, mole fraction, etc.?

One of my homework questions (see image) asks us to calculate the molarity, molality, mole fraction, and mass percent of the solutes of various mixtures. The question includes the remark "Remember to ...
3
votes
1answer
56 views

Ordinary differential equation for molecule collision

My knowledge in 0 in chemistry. But, I have a good background in mathematics and computer programming. I have planed to simulate the collision of two simple molecules $\ce{Br2}$ and $\ce{H2}$ just ...
2
votes
0answers
93 views

Why does CO2 have higher boiling point than CO?

The intermolecular forces between $\ce{CO2}$ molecules are dispersion forces, while the forces between $\ce{CO}$ molecules are mostly dipole-dipole attraction forces. So, why does $\ce{CO2}$ have a ...
3
votes
1answer
31 views

Why plastic sheets contract when heated?

Why do thin plastic sheets contract when heated, contradictory to the behavior of most other materials ? What are the things going on at the molecular level ?
2
votes
0answers
35 views

Boiling point and Intermolecular forces

After looking for proper reasons for boiling point orders, nobody could even explain why $\ce{CCl4}$ has a higher boiling point than $\ce{SiCl4}$, but after looking for patterns, in lots and cases of ...
0
votes
0answers
25 views

Are heterolytic dissociations barrier-less or do they have an activation energy?

When a bond is broken into ionic fragments, and I'm specifically thinking about organometallic or coordination chemistry, the two products carry opposite charges and the potential energy curve should ...
1
vote
0answers
54 views

Why does chlorine have a higher boiling point than hydrogen chloride?

Chlorine has a boiling point of $238~\mathrm{K}$ while hydrogen chloride has a boiling point of $188~\mathrm{K}$. Hydrogen chloride has dipole-dipole forces so I would expect it to have greater ...
6
votes
0answers
35 views

High Viscosity of Noble Gases

Why are the viscosities of noble gases higher than almost all other gases? This seems counter-intuitive since they have much weaker inter-molecular interactions and lower boiling points. Gas ...
4
votes
1answer
46 views

Trend in the boiling point of the hydrogen halides

The boiling points of the hydrogen halides are as follows: $$\begin{array}{cc} \hline \text{Species} & \text{Boiling point / }\mathrm{^\circ C} \\ \hline \ce{HCl} & -85.1 \\ \ce{HBr} & ...
4
votes
0answers
41 views

Why do chlorinated silanes have lower boiling points than their methane analogs?

The boiling points of the chlorinated silanes and methanes are given below: $$\begin{array}{ccc} \hline \text{Species} & \text{Boiling point (X = Si) / }\mathrm{^\circ C} & \text{Boiling ...
0
votes
1answer
81 views

Why is the boiling point of CH3COOH higher than that of C2H5OH?

Why is the boiling point of $\ce{CH3COOH}$ higher than that of $\ce{C2H5OH}$ ? Both are polar molecules held by hydrogen bond.
8
votes
3answers
299 views

Can nonpolar molecules exhibit dipole-dipole forces?

Dipole-dipole forces occur when the positive part of a polar molecule is attracted to the negative part of a polar molecule. In a nonpolar molecule, there may still be polar bonds, it's just that the ...
4
votes
0answers
33 views

Calculating volume ethanol in an fermented aqueous solution of sucrose, water, and ethanol

I've been working on a biology experiment where I calculate the fermentation yield of yeast under various light induced stress responses inhibiting the translation of various fermentation enzymes. My ...
0
votes
1answer
46 views

What is the connection between vapor pressure and intermolecular force explanations of boiling?

I've had boiling explained to me in two ways, and I'm having trouble understanding how they connect. The first way is that a liquid is held together by the intermolecular forces, and boiling involves ...
0
votes
1answer
38 views

Are the collisions between the real gas particles perfectly elastic?

Well my question is simple, if two real gas particles are colliding (head on collision) then will the kinetic energy will be conserved i.e. will it be a perfectly elastic collisions?
3
votes
1answer
38 views

How to save the force on a molecule in GROMACS?

I am a new student of molecular dynamics. I have started using GROMACS since one month. I have a small box of 8192 molecules each with 3 atoms. I have frozen the last molecule and run the simulation. ...
3
votes
3answers
156 views

H2Te dipole and electronegativities of H and Te (high school level chemistry)

I saw somewhere that $\ce{H2Te}$ is a polar molecule, but as far as I know the only time dipole-dipole forces arise (giving molecules the possibility of becoming polar) are when there is a difference ...
1
vote
1answer
43 views

Why are noble gases 'gases'?

Why do group 18 elements exist as gases, why are they not found in any other physical state ?
0
votes
0answers
11 views

Would graphite stick to basalt cooled from its molten state in a graphite mold?

Molten metal that is poured into a graphite mold pops out easily once it has cooled. Would basalt poured the same way pop out just as easily? I am particularly interested in lunar basalt, if that ...
1
vote
1answer
41 views

London Forces and Liquifying Noble Gases

From my book, it says that 'without van der Waals (London Dispersion) forces, it would be impossible to liquefy noble gases.' Why is this the case?
0
votes
0answers
57 views

What happens to the attraction of glycerol to a positively charged acetate rod if water is added

I know that glycerol is more polar than water because it has stronger intermolecular forces and its also more viscous. If I were to add water to a glycerol solution, would the solution get less polar ...
1
vote
1answer
41 views

Why the boiling point decreases with increase in branching in alkyl groups?

I found out its answer that with increase in branching, the molecules attains a spherical shape with less surface area. As a result, interparticle forces become weaker resulting in lower boiling ...
0
votes
0answers
25 views

Why do cohesion and adhesion increase with smaller powder particles?

I am wondering why cohesion and adhesion increase when one would decrease particle size of a powder mixture. I've searched on google a bit but can't really find an explaination and in my textbook it ...
2
votes
2answers
356 views

How does a water molecule bond to an anhydrous salt to form a hydrate?

Some sites suggest that water molecules bong to anhydrous salt via a "loose bond". What does that even mean? $\ce{H2O}$ is a polar molecule and salts are made up of ionic bonds. Is it a hydrogen bond ...
2
votes
1answer
165 views

Why is Iodine's melting point is lower than water?

My teacher told us that melting point of Iodine is lower than Ice as it is a Simple molecular structure bonded by weak van der waals forces. However I gooogle and found out its melting point is ...
0
votes
1answer
911 views

Intermolecular Forces for Ionic Compound?

So in class we have learned London dispersion, dipole-dipole, ion-dipole and hydrogen bonding for intermolecular forces. Our teacher always uses covalent molecules as examples. So I was wondering ...
0
votes
2answers
42 views

What other intermoelcular forces can exist between neutral molecules?

I've been doing some basic chemistry exercises (about intermolecular forces), and there are two I failed and don't quite understand: What kind of intermolecular forces can exist between neutral ...
1
vote
1answer
59 views

Why do self-replicating molecules dissociate?

I am new to chemistry (have only done a GCSE) so I apologize for my lack of knowledge. But I am confused about why self-replicating molecules dissociate. It is my understanding that a ...
0
votes
2answers
365 views

Sublimation of Iodine

Why does iodine sublime? I have researched it myself and I have got the same answer; it sublimes because it directly converts from solid to gas. But why don't bromine or chlorine also sublime?
4
votes
2answers
409 views

Basis for the hydrophobic effect?

I'm confused about why hydrophobic molecules, which do not have high polarity, would have a tendency to attract and cluster with themselves. It is easier to understand the hydrophilic as long as one ...
4
votes
1answer
137 views

Calculation of non-bonded interaction energies (Organic Molecule)

If one were to calculate the non-bonded interaction energy between two atoms this would equate to the sum of vdw + electrostatic potential energy. Could anyone please explain how I could calculate ...
7
votes
1answer
74 views

What structural property creates stickiness?

Recently, me and my mom parked her car in a spot reserved for customers of a super expensive shoe store while going to get some also fairly expensive drinks at Starbucks. When we came back, an ...
2
votes
1answer
87 views

Molecules made of molecules?

When a molecule of water ($\ce{H2O}$) and a molecule of hydrochloric acid ($\ce{HCl}$) react together, would they become a molecule made of molecules? What's the name for such thing? How would it be ...
10
votes
2answers
723 views

Is Hydrogen Bonding a Type of Dipole Dipole Interaction?

I understand that dipole dipole forces is due to the attraction of the different partials charges of atoms in different molecules due to their different electro-negativities. For hydrogen bonding, ...
0
votes
0answers
351 views

What are the intermolecular and intramolecular forces between Hg molecules/ atoms in liquid mercury?

Mercury is the only metal that is liquid at room temperature. I know that metallic bonding exists between metal atoms but my knowledge is limited to metallic bonding found in solids. Will there ...
0
votes
0answers
169 views

Determining which substance has the highest vapor pressure

I'm learning about intermolecular forces. This is part of the exercise: Which substance will have the highest vapor pressure? $\ce{CH4}$ $\ce{CH3CH2OH}$ $\ce{CHCl3}$ ...
2
votes
1answer
34 views

Why is it possible to use lipids to recover diamonds in mining?

Diamond mining This link says that diamonds will stick to "anything oleaginous" and that other materials slide down the fat that is applied to an inclined plane used in the mining apparatus. I infer ...
7
votes
3answers
414 views

At what frequency does a non-polar molecule acquire a dipole able to participate in London Dispersion forces?

London Dispersion forces are forces between non-polar non-ionic molecules that the random fluctuation of their electrons makes them temporarily dipoles. What is the frequency that this occurs? Every ...
-1
votes
1answer
47 views

induction of van der Waals forces

Is there a way to maximize van der Waals forces between two materials, by electrifying one material, thus creating dipoles/instantaneous dipoles and thus creating stronger van der Waals forces? has ...
4
votes
1answer
82 views

Is there a relationship between London dispersion forces and hydrophobic interactions? [duplicate]

Looking at examples of these two molecular interactions makes me wonder what the differences or similarities are exactly.
4
votes
2answers
552 views

Why not an Avogadro's principle for solid matter?

Avogadro stated that for any ideal gas, 1 mole of particles will occupy a specific volume at a specific ratio of pressure and temperature. So why doesn't this apply to a liquid or solid?
2
votes
2answers
99 views

Fundamental physical forces behind osmosis

I wonder which fundamental forces act behind osmosis process? Sum of these forces oppose gravity force, like in this figure: So I wonder what are these forces?
4
votes
1answer
78 views

Bending of water and methanol towards a charged objects

I just had a question about why does water, methanol or any other polar substances tend to bend towards the charged object. I think it is because of a slight dipole dipole movement between the ...
8
votes
1answer
927 views

Is an ionic bond more like a covalent bond or an intermolecular force?

I have asked a question loosely asking this, where I confused terms and did not specify what I wanted to know here, so I formed a new question. What are the differences and similarities between ionic ...
8
votes
1answer
270 views

How to read TINKER's force field parameters

I'm going to parameterize AMBER force field for the simulation of some small molecules. I have found the parameter sets provided by TINKER at here. I'm stuck here because I couldn't find any ...
11
votes
3answers
809 views

Strength of hydrogen bonding in phenol or methanol

I wanted to know whether hydrogen bonding is stronger in phenol or methanol. I saw on Wikipedia about the enthalpies of hydrogen bonding in various cases. but could not find the answer to this ...
1
vote
0answers
288 views

How to determine if a compound is likely to become a solid at room temperature?

Reasoning: My guess would have to be that it has to do with the strength of the intermolecular forces between each molecules. Take for example, molecular compounds that have a very low molar mass like ...
7
votes
4answers
6k views

Why is CF4 non-polar and CHF3 polar?

This question is a bit tricky to me because of the following: Take in consideration these two molecules: $\ce{CHF3}$ and $\ce{CF4}$ These are their Lewis dot structure: $\ce{CHF3}$ $\ce{CF4}$ ...
5
votes
2answers
65 views

Why is there a greater degree of separation in a dipole-dipole interaction?

My textbook says this: Electrostatic forces between two ions decrease by the factor $\frac{1}{d^2}$ as their separation distance, $d$, increases. Dipole–dipole forces, however, vary as ...