In atomic physics and quantum chemistry, the electron configuration is the distribution of electrons of an atom or molecule (or other physical structure) in atomic or molecular orbitals.

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What's the electronic configuration of Nickel and Oxygen in RNiO3 (R=Rare-Earth)?

Nickel's electronic ground state is $\mathrm{3d^8 4s^2}$ (there's a dispute on this, but let's not worry about it for now). Oxygen's is $\mathrm{2s^2 2p^4}$. In a Rare-Earth based Nickelate with ...
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Doesn't the fact that the lone pair on the nitrogen in amides occupy a p orbital contradict Hund's rules?

Since the $\ce{sp^2}$ hybridized orbitals are lower in energy than the p orbital shouldn't the $\ce{sp^2}$ orbitals fill first? Why is this not the case - two electrons fill the p orbitals while all ...
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Difference between shells, subshells and orbitals

What are the definitions of these three things and how are they related? I've tried looking online but there is no concrete answer online for this question.
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Electron interference

Assuming that electrons behave as both waves and particles, and that waves(like in double slit experiment) can interfere with themselves: Do electrons actually move in any direction, or do they just ...
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Can the electron configuration of Te be written that way?

Normally, the electron configuration of Te is known as: $$\begin{aligned} {[Kr]} 5s^2 \ce{4d^10} 5p^4 \end{aligned}$$ Then, one day I was asked in a exam if this can be written also as: ...
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Is my analysis correct when answering this question about quantum numbers?

Which series of quantum numbers describes the highest (energy) occupied orbital in a ground state of At atom? a) n = 6, l = 0 b) n = 6, l = 2 c) n = 5, l = 2 d) n = 4, l = 3 e) n = 6, l = 1 ...
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An atom of silicon in its ground state has how many electrons with quantum number l = 1?

I was solving practice problems for electron configuration and periodic table, and I got stuck through a question: An atom of silicon in its ground state has how many electrons with quantum number l ...
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Why does K+ have 0 valence electrons?

If we take a K atom and take away an electron why does it now have 0 valence electrons as it states in my General Chemistry textbook? I would think that if we do this, it would have the same exact ...
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Is there a general method for working out electron configurations?

For up to period 3, elements' electron configurations are relatively easy to work out until the transition metals begin. Then some elements may have $\ce{4s}$ orbitals which are preferred by electrons ...
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Why does gallium nitride allow an AESA radar to be more powerful than a radar with elements made of gallium arsenide?

AESA (Actively Electronically Scanned Array) radars use thousands of individual transmit/receive elements to create a radar. All in service AESAs use gallium arsenide as the material in the t/r ...
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Why do different impurities create different colors in diamonds?

Traces of nitrogen make diamonds yellow while traces of boron make them blue. What accounts for the differences in color for a given element?
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How can I tell what colour an element will be? [duplicate]

Previously in my Chemistry education, it was required of us to memorise the colour changes some elements, especially transition metals, go through. Currently we learning about electron configuration ...
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How much energy does it cost to have electron configurations that are not in accordance with Hund's rules?

What is a ballpark figure for the difference in energy for an atom that follows Hund's rule vs one that has two electrons with opposite spins? I'd be interested to know carbon and nitrogen. Is there ...
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What would the Electronic Configuration of Ru²⁺ be?

I'm doing homework for Inorganic Chemistry, and I am a little confused. The Question is: What is the electronic configuration of $\ce{Ru^{2+}}$? If I were to remove from the highest energy ...
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Why do Group 10 transition metals (and Cu) lose an S electron to fill the D shell? [duplicate]

I don't understand why it varies between Group 10 metals (as with Palladium, Platinum and Darmstadtium) and Copper (Group 11). If each of Palladium, Platinum and Darmstadtium entirely filled the ...
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Determining anomolous electron configuration [duplicate]

There are 21 anomalous elements in the periodic table: $Cr,\, Cu ,\, Nb,\, Mo,\, Ru,\, Rh,\, Pd,\, Ag,\, La,\, Ce,\, Gd,\, Pt,\, Au,\, Ac,\, Th,\, Pa,\, U,\, Np,\, Cm,\, Ds \,and\, Rg.$ I understand ...
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Photoelectric Effect in Semiconductors

Is the photoelectric effect possible for semiconductors? I imagine that this might be, if possible, a two-photon process: excitation of an electron from a filled to conductance band, and then on to ...
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What is meant by complete outer shell? Why do the noble gases have zero valency?

Does having 8 or 2 electron in the outmost shell mean its outmost shell is full and its valency is zero? I know that the 3rd and 4th shell can contain 18 and 32 electrons. Then how can Argon's ...
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Electronic configuration of Ace-Ala-Nme

Below is the structure of Ace-Ala-Nme. I have labelled just four of the carbon atoms (1-4 in blue). I need to identify (i) the hybridization state, and (ii) the number of electron withdrawing groups ...
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Explanation for increase in the number of oxidation states for transition elements from Sc to Mn of the 4th period

From Sc, to Mn, the number of oxidation states increases from one (Sc) to seven (Mn). The explanation for this is because the unpaired 3d electrons can be lost along with the 4s electrons during ...
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Why is carbon tetravalent?

How does the electron from the 2s orbital "jump" to the 2p, thus leaving 4 unpaired electrons to form four covalent bonds? Also, does the octet rule not apply to carbon? If it does, how can it bond ...
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copper is more stable in+2 rather than+1 [duplicate]

Despite the fact that its electronic configuration is 3d104s1, why is copper usually found on nature in+2. Instead of more intuitive+1? I know we can explain based on enthalpies but is there a better ...
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Shells, orbitals, subshells, and energy levels

I think i Know what these mean, each row on the periodic table has a new shell of electrons, a subshell is e.g. 1s, 2s, 2p, 3s, 3p, etc and energy levels are the same as shells whilst orbitals are the ...
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Valence Shell for Transition Metals

In transition metals, is the shell with the highest energy considered the valence shell? For example, in copper the electronic configuration is ${[Ar]\text{ } 3d^{10}\text{ } 4s^{1}}$. However, in ...
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Ground State Configuration

Studying for an exam tomorrow, I came across this question. Which two ions have the same electron configuration in the ground state? A) $\ce{Rb^+}$ and $\ce{Cs^+}$ B) $\ce{Ba^2+}$ and $\ce{I^-}$ ...
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Why can Cu have an oxidation number of +2?

The electronic configuration for $\ce{Cu}$, adjusted for Hund's rule, is: $[\ce{Ar}] 3d^{10} 4s^1$ So, shouldn't $\ce{Cu}$ have an oxidation number of $+1$? whereby it gives off its outermost 4s ...
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MacGyvered chlorine gas protection

I was watching Periodic Video's chlorine video, which discusses Chlorine's ferocity in stripping electrons whenever possible, and the professors mentioned its consequent use in WWII as a chemical ...
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How are electrons in conjugated molecules excited? [duplicate]

I have recently started reading about colour in organic molecules and come across conjugation of pi bonds. My question is pretty short... In transition metal ions I understand colour is caused by ...
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What is the appropriate procedure for determining the quantum numbers of an electron?

How do I find the set of quantum numbers for a specific electron in an element? For example, Calculate the set of quantum numbers for the 19th electron in chromium. The electronic configuration ...
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Why is the 8-electron rule more important than the 2- or 18-electron rule

Why is the fulfilled electronic configuration of only $p$ orbital is stable. I mean why $II-B $ group with fulfilled $d$ orbital,$II-A$ group with fulfilled $s$ orbital...are not stable. Why makes ...
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Could someone please explain the difference between m/z and m/e in mass spectroscopy

The definition: The abbreviation m/z is used to denote the dimensionless quantity formed by dividing the mass number of an ion by its charge number. It has long been called the mass-to-charge ratio ...
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Bonding, multiplicity and quantum chemistry for FeP$_2$

I'm trying to do some quantum chemical calculations for the linear molecule FeP$_2$ in the gas phase as well as its crystal (orthorhombic symmetry like here). I am lead to believe that in both cases ...
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How to determine mineral properties based on chemical formula?

I need to learn a bunch of minerals and their properties. What I want is some sort of rule which helps me deduce color, crystal system, luster etc. I know that different kind of ions give specific ...
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Is there an energy cost associated with flipping the spin of an electron?

THE STORY: A common example used to illustrate the limitations of restricted Hartree-Fock (RHF) theory is the H$_2$ dissociation energy ($D_e$) curves. RHF enforces electrons to be paired into spin ...
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Do Lithium and Beryllium want to lose electrons to be like Helium?

I can't seem to remember. I know that they all want to fill their valence shells, but, aren't these different?
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A reversible exothermic reaction between a molecule in an excited triplet state and a reducing agent

Say I promote a molecule to a triplet state via repeated electronic excitation events. Here, this is going to mean that an electron from the HOMO level, originally with a spin-UP and spin-DOWN ...
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What does the subscript of atomic orbital mean?

As everyone knows, the atomic orbital can be classified as $s, p_z, p_x, p_y, d_{z^2},d_{xz},d_{yz},d_{xy},d_{x^2-y^2}$ and so on. I want to know the meaning of $z^2,x^2-y^2$ and so on. Maybe this is ...
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If two electrons move up to a higher energy level in an atom, is it considered excited?

In Germanium, if two electrons go from 1s go to 4p is it in its excited state?
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Why is the orbital angular momentum of a pi electron along the axis of two atoms' molecule one?

I'm reading quantum chemistry. The book says that the orbital angular momentum of a $\pi$ electron along the symmetry axis of a molecule made up of two atoms is $\pm 1$. I think this is a primary ...
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Classifying atoms as metals or nonmetals based on the periodic table [closed]

The electron configuration of the outer shell of four atoms are: $X: 3s^23p^3, Y: 6s^26p^3, Z: 3s^23p^4 T: 6s^26p^4$. I don't know if these atoms are metal or nonmetal. Please classify the four ...
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Ground state electron configuration of chromium

What is the ground state electron configuration of chromium? Is it [Ar]4s23d4 or Is it [Ar]4s13d5
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lanthanide contraction

"The Lanthanide Contraction refers to the fact that the 5s and 5p orbitals penetrate the 4f sub-shell so the 4f orbital is not shielded from the increasing nuclear change." First, 5s and 5p are ...
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Why does $\text{Cr}^{3+}$ not have the same electron configuration as $\text{Sc}$?

To be explicit, $\text{Cr}^{3+}$ and $\text{Sc}$ have the same number of electrons, the only difference is the nuclear charge. This is not an isolated anomaly, it seems: the book I'm using claim ...
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The energy gap between a pi-conjugated system with (2 bonding and 1 anti-bonding orbital) and (1 bonding and 2 anti-bonding) orbitals

I asked a question previously about "why" it is the case the expanding the size of pi-conjugated systems decreases the required energy to excite an electron from a HOMO to a LUMO band: Why does the ...
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Does the emission spectrum for a dye depend on the frequency of light used to excite the dye?

Take a look at the emission spectrum for an arbitrary fluorescent dye: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Fluorescein_spectra.jpg Does the emission spectrum depend on exciting the dye at its peak ...
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Why does the energy gap for π - π* transitions shrink with the size of the pi-conjugated system?

Quoting from this site: As conjugated pi systems become larger, the energy gap for a π - π* transition becomes increasingly narrow, and the wavelength of light absorbed correspondingly becomes ...
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maximum number of electrons each shell

In my textbook it says that the maximum number of electrons that can fit in any given shell is given by 2n². Which would mean 2 electrons could fit in the first shell, 8 could fit in the second shell, ...
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Why does the 3rd electron shell start filling up with scandium?

The electron configuration of calcium is 2, 8, 8, 2, where up to that point each shell, asides from the first shell counts up to 8 - why then does scandium have an electron configuration of 2, 8, 9, ...
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Where does the 9th electron go in a $\ce{N=O}$ bond?

In the first resonating structure you can see 5 unpaired electrons and 4 shared electrons on nitrogen, then isn't this a extended octet? If it is so, then in which orbital that 9th electron is ...