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In multiple sources (example), I found the information that the kinetic energy $E_k$ measured using (Ultraviolet / X-ray) Photoelectron Spectroscopy is given by:

$E_k = h\nu - B.E._F - \phi_{spec}$

where $h\nu$ is the energy carried by the incident photon, $B.E._F$ the energy difference between the energy level of the electron and the Fermi energy and $\phi_{spec}$ the work function of the spectrometer.

As far as I understood the measurement process, the actually measured quantity in Photoelectron Spectroscopy is the kinetic energy $E_k$ of the electron. This energy is measured by the radius of the electron in a homogeneous electric field. Thus, the kinetic energy of the electron after the emission would $E_k = h\nu - B.E._F - \phi_{sample}$, this independent of the work function of the spectrometer. So where does this difference come from?

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