Take the 2-minute tour ×
Chemistry Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for scientists, academics, teachers and students. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In standard periodic table layout , all the elements upto 56 are in order i.e are in the same layout table. However, lanthanides and actinides are always shown separately from the layout like in this layout.

What is the reason behind this structure? Is this standard layout or can I represent like this this too ?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The Periodic Table arranges elements in blocks as each type of orbital fills with electrons - s,p,d,f,g,h. Alkali metals and alkaline earths are s-block filling (but could be one s-block slot). p-Block six electrons to fill are trelides, tetralides, pnticides, chalcogenides, halides, inert gases (but could be one p-block slot). Transition metal d-block is ten elements (but could be one d-block slot). Filling the f-block are 14 elements, lanthanoids and actinoids. That gets sloppy to print and the elements are (or at least were) overall obscure. They get condensed.

Representing the Periodic Table has become an an art form. The plain vanilla variety is terse and useful.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alternative_periodic_tables

share|improve this answer

Because if you put lanthanides and actinides in to the periodic table like transition metals, the table will be way too wide.

share|improve this answer

Also the actinides and lanthanides have very similar chemical behaviour- I think nearly all have a possible +3 oxidation state and similar metallurgical behaviour. For a long time, lanthanides was added as mishmetal to steel alloys.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.